Skip to main content

Full text of "Community colleges for North Carolina : a study of need, locations, and service areas"

See other formats












II 







llllil 






THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 



THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C630.5 
N8aep 
RSh2 
c.3 



00006768250 



This BOOK may be kept out TWO WEEKS 
ONLY, and is subject to a fine of FIVE 
CENTS a day thereafter. It is DUE on the 
DAY indicated below: 







. ! I 

- ■ ■ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/communitycollegeOOhami 



On ti 



Ch=» ■ 



:*b 01 



THE GOVERNOR'S COMMISSION 
ON, THE STATUS OP WOMEN 



COMMUNITY COLLEGES 
FOR NORTH CAROLINA 

A Study of Need, Location, and Service Areas 



By C. Horace Hamilton 





:IMm 






for the 
NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

and the 
GOVERNOR'S COMMISSION ON EDUCATION BEYOND HIGH SCHOOL 



COMMUNITY COLLEGES FOR WORTH CAROLINA 



A Study of Need , Locations , and Service Areas 



By 



C. Horace Hamilton 



for the 



North Carolina Board of Higher Education 



and the 



Governor's Commission on Education Beyond the High School 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Foreword ii 

Acknowledgments iii 

Introduction 1 

Objectives of the Study 3 

Some Basic Assumptions 4- 

Methods of Study 8 

Highlights of the Study 17 

Map of Community College Areas 30 

Statistical Data on Community College Areas ...... 32 

Statistical Tables 45 

Bibliography 67 



11 



In the fall of 196l, The Governor's Commission on Education 
Beyond the High School and the Board of Higher Education requested 
Dr. C. Horace Hamilton, Reynolds professor of Rural Sociology at ITorth. 
Carolina State College to make a fresh study of enrollment projections 
for ITorth Carolina, colleges and universities, 1962-30. This valuable 
study was completed in January, I962. 

Once again, the Governor's Commission and the Board of Higher 
Education turned to Dr. Hamilton for a detailed ctudy of the entire state, 
by counties and areas, to determine the possible need for additional tax- 
supported institutions. This study, presented herewith, points up the 
need for the state and the private institutions, wherever possible, to 
move rapidly toward an expansion of educational facilities, if the needs 
of the state for the next eight to ten years are to be met. 

Dr. Hamilton has provided invaluable information to all parties 
concerned end deserves the thanks of all the citizens of ITorth Carolina. 
The Governor's Commission and the Board of Higher Education desire 
particularly to commend Dr. Hamilton for his splendid services, and to 
thank the authorities of ITorth Carolina State College for hr.ving made it 
possible that Dr. Hamilton do this important work. 



John L. Sanders, Secretary, William C. Archie, Director, 

Governor's Commission on ITorth Carolina Board of 

Education Beyond the High School Higher Education 



iii 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The author wishes to express his sincere appreciation to the many 
individuals and agencies who have made this study possible. 

Throughout the period of the study the author worked closely with 
Dr. William C. Archie, Director of the North Carolina Board of Higher Edu- 
cation, and members of his professional staff, Dr. Howard R. Booaer and 
Mr. Kenneth Batchelor, and with Mr. John L. Sanders, Secratary of the 
Governor's Commission on Education 3eyond the High School. Also, the author 
wishes to acknowledge the helpful suggestions received from members of the 
Commission's College Survey Subcommittee of which Dr. Archie was Chairman. 
Members of this Committee included s Bonnie E. Cone, President of Charlotte 
College; James F. Alexander, Director of Mecklenburg College 5 Glenn L. 
Bushey, President of Asheville-Biltmore College ; Robert C. Benson, Presi- 
dent of the College of the Albemarle" William M. Randall, President of 
Wilmington College 5 and William C. Friday, President of the University of 
North Carolina. Without the privilege of meeting frequently with this 
Committee, the study would not have been possible. 

Special acknowledgment is made of the many stimulating suggestions 
and helpful cooperation of the faculty and staff of the State College 
Department of Rural Sociology of which Dr. Selz C. Mayo is head. 

C. Horace Hamilton 



DI'IRODUCTIOM 

The ciiief aim of the community college movement in ITorth 
Carolina is to increase and "broaden educational opportunity for thousands 
of our young people who, for economic and social reasons, cannot other- 
wise continue their education beyond the high school. ITorth Carolina is 
still one of the lower income states in the nation. A large proportion of 
the parents of high school graduates cannot afford the expense of either a 
private school v/hich may he within commuting distance, or of a public 
college not within commuting distance. 

But more than income is involved. Many young people are needed 
at home to help take care of their parents, brothers and sisters, and to 
help operate small farms and businesses. Furthermore, the presence of a 
local community college will be a pou-erful psychological factor in 
motivating young people to attend college. 

Another important just if i cat ion for the community college is 
public economy. College dormitories and related facilities are expensive. 
A modern college dormitory, with related utilities and facilities costs 
from three to four thousand dollars per student. A community college with 
an enrollment of from 'iCO to 600 college level students will save the tax 
payers (or private colleges, too) about $1,590,000 for dormitories alone. 
In addition, it will save the students and their parents the direct and 
immediate costs of board and room away from home — a large proportion of 
the cost of attending a public college away from home. 

As defined in the Forth Carolina nlan, a community college will 
offer: (l) freshman and sophomore college level courses in the arts, 



2 

humanities, and basic sciences; (2) technical, vocational, and adult 
education courses for both college and noncollege students interested 
primarily in improving their productivity and earning power. 

Since only a small proportion of the total population can be 
expected to complete a four-year college program, possibly not over 15 
or 20 percent, it is expected that the enrollment in a comprehensive 
community college will include more students taking technical, voca- 
tional, and other terminal courses than the number talcing courses basic 
to advanced education in senior colleges and graduate schools. 

The community college is, what its name implies, a community 
institution in the sense that it will be attended principally by stu- 
dents from the larger community who can and will commute to college. 
There will be no dormitories and other elaborate and expensive facili- 
ties required by residence colleges. The community college plant will 
consist mainly of buildings for instruction, (including adequate laboratories, 
and a library), administration, auxiliary services and utilities. The total 
cost of a community college plant will range between one and two million 
dollars, depending on the expected enrollment, cost of the land, and 
other variable factors. Some of the larger and more elaborate institu- 
tions may cost substantially more — a large expense item being scientific 
laboratories and facilities for technical and vocational training. 

These proposed institutions are also "community" in the sense 
that they will belong to the local community and will be oriented toward 
the cultural characteristics, social life, and economic needs of the com- 
munities in which the colleges are to be located. It is expected that these 
small local institutions will stimulate and nurture the interest of all 
local people in higher education and in economic and social development of 
their areas. 



OBJECTIVES OP THE STUDY 

The major objective of this study has "been to determine optimum 
locations, service areas and potential enrollments of community colleges 
in ITorth Carolina, iiinor objectives of the study include: 

(1) A projection of college-age population and of high school 
graduates for both counties and community college areas. 

(2) An analysis of the enrollment of Horth Carolina college 
students ~oy county of residence and location of college attendance. 

(3) An analysis of the relation of income, urban residence, 
college location, and type of college to the percentage of ITorth Carolina 
graduates who enter college. 

(k) An appraisal of the probable effect of the establishment 
of community colleges on enrollment in -public and private colleges. 



SOME BASIC ASSUMPTIONS 

Two primary factors affecting the optimum locations and service 
areas of community colleges are: (1) the distance that college students 
can be expected to travel in commuting to college; and (2) the minimum 
and the ideal number of students required for the proposed community 
colleges. Other factors, some coordinate and some subsidiary, which are 
involved are: (a) population density, urbanization, and distribution; 
(b) direction and rates of population change; (c) presence of other col- 
leges — public and private; (d) income levels of the population. 

The Distance Factor 

It was assumed that students could and would travel from 25 to 
30 miles in order to attend a public community college. This assumption 
is based partly on personal judgment but mostly on studies which have 
been made of commuting to college. The assumption was discussed fully 
x/ith and accepted by the College Survey Committee of which William C, 
Archie was chairman. 

In making this assumption we were fully aware of its limita- 
tions. Miles to be traveled are not so important as time, convenience, 
cost, and means of travel. Twenty-f ive miles might require only 35 or 
^4-0 minutes under some conditions, but more than an hour under other 
conditions. Topography, roads, traffic, and means of transportation vary 
from one part of the state to another. Also, rivers and other natural 
barriers must be taken into consideration. Unfortunately, not every 
youth who may wish to attend a public community college v/ill have the 



See particularly American Association of Junior Colleges, Establishing 
Legal Bases for Community Colleges , page 31, and D. G. Morrison and 
S. V. Martorana, Criteria for the Establishment of 2-Year Colleges , 
U. S. Dept. of Health, Education, and '/elfare, Bulletin I96I, Ho. 2. 



5 
use of either an automobile or a motorcycle or even a motor scooter. 
In such cases, it is to be hoped that both community and personal 
resources will he utilized in a way to provide needed transportation 
for those who do not have it. 

Fianlly, v;e have not forgotten that even on modern highways 
traveling to school is expensive. At a flat rate of seven cents a mile, 
the cost of traveling 50 miles a day for 22 days a month would amount to 
$77-00 per month or about $700 for a school year. Obviously car pools 
and public transportation must be developed wherever possible. Of 
course, not every student will have to travel 25 miles, but a few, 
possibly 5 percent, will commute more than 25 miles. 

The Size Factor 



Here it was assumed that a community college should have within 
Wo years of opening a potential enrollment of at least 400 students, in 
college parallel work, from the local area to be served by the college. 

The advantages in large enrollment are found in the opportunity 
provided for a diversified and enriched curricula and for lowering unit 
costs of fined expenses. Although bigness may be desirable from these 
points of vie\r, it should not become a compulsive value. In some of the 
more isolated sections of the state, it might be both necessary and 
desirable to establish a few small community colleges in order to pro- 
vide higher educational opportunity for young people who would not 
otherwise have an opportunity to attend college. For these reasons, we 
have delineated a number of community college areas having potential 
enrollments of less than ^00. 

It is assumed, however, that colleges would not be established 
in such areas except on the basis of more intensive local surveys designed 



6 

to determine local need, interest, means of support, and potential 

enrollment. 

Population Concentration and Growth 

It was assumed that community colleges, if they are to have a 
good chance for survival and growth, should be located in or near large 
growing population centers. In such areas, it has been found a higher 
percentage of the population feels the need for college education and 
other education beyond the high school. Furthermore, the graduates of 
community colleges in such areas, it was felt, would be more likely to 
find employment in some of the many businesses and occupations found 
only in urban areas. 

In spite of this assumption, a few areas have been delineated 
in the great rural areas of the state lying at some distance from metro- 
politan centers and from college locations. Forth Carolina is still a 
rural state. In i960, for example, 60.5 .^percent of the state's 4,556,000 
population lived in rural areas. Many of these areas are now involved 
in economic development programs designed to attract industry ajid to 
create new employment opportunity. It is believed that the development 
of a comprehensive college system which will provide courses in industrial, 
technical, and vocational education, as well as college parallel courses, 
will make a substantial contribution to local economic development. 

Presence or Absence of Other Colleges 

It was assumed that highest priority should be given to loca- 
tions at the greatest distance from existing public and private colleges. 
However, in this respect, other factors were also considered. For example, 
the extent to which private colleges were meeting needs was given careful 



7 
study. In comparing existing public and private college areas, it was 
found that public colleges were enrolling a much higher percentage of 
local high school graduates than were private colleges. In some private 
college communities the enrollment of local students was very low. Fur- 
ther facts on this situation are presented elsewhere. 

It was assumed that little or no competition exists between 
private senior colleges and public community (junior) colleges. What 
the private senior college stands to lose in lower class enrollment will 
be regained in upper class enrollment. As a matter of fact, it was 
found that competition for students is statewide and that the establish- 
ment of community colleges would also have some bearing on enrollment in 
the lower classes of public colleges all over the state. On the other 
hand, it was assumed, reasonably we think, that this potential loss for 
both public and private colleges will be more than offset by the great 
impending increase in college enrollment. 

Income and Financial Sup-port 

ITorth Carolina is still a relatively low income state and 
contains man:/ communities in which incomes are unusually low. This 
hard f .ct of life has led to the following assumptions: (a) consider- 
able state suoport will be needed in the operation; and (b) only by 
building community colleges will it be made possible for many children 
of poor parents to obtain a college education. A large proportion of 
ITorth Carolina's families simply cannot afford either the tuition cost 
of a private college or the cost of board and room incident to attending 
a -oublic college at some distance. 



ILETHODS OP STUDY 

Proj ection of College-Age Population by Counties 

The projection of college-age population was part of an over- 
all projection of the total population by age, sex, and color. The method 

used in the total projection has "been described in detail in a paper by 

2 

Hamilton and Perry. This method is based on a simple formula: 

p£ = p * * p£-iq 

P x-10 
in which the P's refer to populations of age groups of age x and x-10 . 
The superscripts refer to the census years 1950, i960, and 1970. In the 
use of the above formula, it is assumed that age-specific rates of mor- 
tality, natality, and net migration during the decade of 1950-6° will be 
continued during the decade of 1970. 

After determining the projected populations for 1970, the col- 
lege-age populations for intercensal years were determined by linear 
intra-cohort interpolation. The results of the use of this method are 
shown in Appendix Tables 1 through 4. The data of Appendix Table 1 are 
based on the i960 census. Although this method of interpolation is as 
"accurate" as any under the circumstances, neither it nor any other method 
can perform miracles. Single year population counts which have once been 
"lost" \\rithin multi-year age classes can never be recovered, neither can 
the exact shape of the intercensal trend by age groups be accurately 
described because of the impossibility of knowing the year-by-year and 



Hamilton, C. Horace, and Perry, Josef, A Short Method for Projecting 
Population from One Decennial Census to Another. To be published in 
an early issue of Social Forces. 



9 
age-by-age effects of migration. Consequently, the intercensal estimates 
mist be considered as somewhat crude hut nonetheless useful approximations, 

The projections of college-age population in counties with 
large military installations and with large colleges and universities are 
not considered to be entirely realistic because of the nature of the mi- 
gration to and from such areas during the 1950' s - iTote particularly 
Orange, Onslow, Cumberland, Carteret, Vayne, and Craven Counties. 

Projection of the ITumber of High School Graduates 

This projection was needed in order to make an estimate of the 
potential enrollment in community colleges in the year 1966, the year in 
which the baby cohort of 19^7 will reach (approximately) the college 
sophomore age. The projection was made for each county for the years 
1962-70 by color and the results were combined to make Appendix Table 5- 
The number of high school graduates in I96I by color are shown in 
Appendix Table 6. 

The projection of high school graduates was based on actual 
enrollment by grades in public schools of each county during the school 
year I96O-6I. State-wide survival or progression ratios, showing crude 
probabilities of attaining high school graduation, were applied to the 
grade enrollment data by color in order to estimate the number of high 
school graduates by years from I962 to 1970. 

Although the state-wide survival ratios reflect past rates of 
net migration, mortality, and the dropping out of school, they are not 
exactly applicable to county school enrollment statistics. This method 
of estimate gives a good approximation to the number of high school gradu- 
ates in each comity because the most important determinant is school 



10 

enrollment. Since, however, migration rates vary by counties, it is 
likely that the estimated number of high school graduates is unreal- 
istic in a few cases. The chances are that the method underestimates 
the number of high school graduates in urban counties and overestimates 
the number in rural counties — but not greatly so. 

Analysis of the Enrollment of ITorth Carolina College Students by County 
of Residence and Location of College Attended . 

As a basis for evaluating the need for community colleges in 
an area, it was necessary to know something of the college attendance 
patterns in the state in relation to county of residence. Fortunately, 
for this purpose, we had available a study ms.de by Dr. J. E. Eillman, 
former Assistant Director of the North Carolina Board of Higher Educa- 
tion. This study was based on reports from all colleges in the state 
for the school year 1960-61. Among other things this study showed: 
(1) home county residence of all students attending ITorth Carolina 
colleges, (2) number and percentage of commuting freshmen and sophomores. 

From these data it was possible to prepare a large table show- 
ing the distribution of ^3,298 ITorth Carolina college undergraduates by 
county and college attended. Prom this master table it was also possible 
to prepare brief tables for each community college county and each college 
showing patterns of college attendance by county. Some of the results of 
this study are shown in Appendix Tables 7 and 8 and other results are 
shown in the individual area analyses. 

This study showed, among other things, for each county with a 
college, just how many students attended their home county college. Thus 
it was possible to study the home county "enrolling power" of all colleges. 
This was especially valuable in studying the potential competition between 



11 

public and private colleges. It was possible to show, for example, that 
dO percent of the Jackson County college students were attending Western 
ITorth Carolina College and that 119 students commuted from Haywood County 
to Western Horth Carolina College; that a certain private college enrolled 
28 percent of their home county's ITorth Carolina undergraduates; and just 
how a private college and a public college, located in adjoining counties, 
fared in attracting students from each other's county. Many other uses 
were found for the valuable data of the Hillman Survey of i960. It is 
the type of study which should be repeated from time to time. 

Factors Affecting the Percentage of ITorth Carolina High School graduates 
Who Enter College 

Using the data of the annual Follow-Up Survey of North Carolina 
High School Graduates, it was possible to design a multiple variate 
analysis problem by which the relationship of a number of relevant fac- 
tors to college attendance could be appraised in statistical terms. In 
this analysis we used the following variates measured on a county unit 
basis: 

1) Per capita state personal income tax. 

2) Percent urban population. 

3) Percent aonwhite population. 
h) Presence of a public college. 

5) Presence of a private college. 

6) Percent of 196I high school graduates who 

entered college in I961. 

The last variate listed above is the "dependent 11 variate and the others 
are "independent" (or causal) variates. 

Although there are many other variables related to college 
attendance (such as education of po.rents, for example), this analysis 



12 

did make it possible for us to evaluate approximately the effect of col- 
lege location on college attendance. By this method it was possible to 
explain approximately fifty percent of the county variance in college ea- 
rollment among ilorth Carolina graduates of public high schools. Attention 
is called to the fact that, since the county is the unit of measurement, 
variance in college attendance within counties is not involved. In order 
to evaluate accurately the fa.ctors influencing individual college enroll- 
ment, it would be necessary to have individual data such as that provided 

by the United States Census Bureau in its current population sample 

3 

surveys. 

Techniques Used in Locating and Outlining Community College Service Areas 
First of all, tentative and preliminary selections of community 
college locations were made on the basis of: (1) the number of high 
school graduates in 196l; (2) the size, location, and population of 
urban centers; (3) the distance of county centers from the nearest col- 
leges; (h) the location of both public and private colleges; and, 
finally, (5) personal knowledge of the state. 

The second phase involved the delineation of tentative service 
areas. This was done by using a compass and ruler. Circles, with 25 
mile radii, were drawn around each town or city selected as a center. 
Except in a few cases, the largest populated center of a county was used 
as the focal point. Overlapping circle segments, representing the areas 
within which competition between several centers would occur, were di- 
vided equally between the several centers on the basis of distance. 
Implicitly, this means that it was assumed that comiruting college students 



-5 

•^See, for example, U. S. Bureau of the Census, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, Factors Related to College Attendance of Farm and Honfarm High 
School Graduates: i960. Series Census - ERS (P-27) I-I0.32, June 15, 1$6Z. 



13 
would tend, for obvious reasons, to go to the nearest college. However, 
this assumption does not imply that students should not have complete 
freedom to attend the college of their choice — as is now practiced. 
Rather, this assumption implies only that in the case of two competing 
centers, A and B, just about as many students will go from area a to 
attend college 3 as will go from area B to attend college A. The result 
of this second phase, including the "minimum distance 11 assumption, led 
to a delineation of $5 tentative areas, but two of these were later dis- 
carded because of their small size and nearness to other tentatively 
selected community college areas. The remaining 53 areas are shown on 
Figure 1, the area map shown early in this report. 

The third nhase of this process involved the compilation of 
basic county statistics on population, population change, urban percent- 
age, nonwhite percentage, per capita personal income (1958) » P er capita 
personal state income tax, college-age population i960 and 19&5, number 
of high school graduates in 1961 and expected number of graduates in 
1965i percent of high school graduates attending college in I96I, number 
of students from each county attending college in Worth Carolina in i960 
(Hillman Survey), and the enrollment of these students in their home 
county and adjoining county colleges, if any. 

Fourthly, the above data were distributed to each area in di- 
rect proportion to the total population in each area. The population of 
each area was estimated from township populations available in the United 
States Census reports. If an area line cut across a township, the pro- 
portion of township population lying within a given area was estimated by 
inspection in terms of fractions of one-tenth of the township. Obviously, 
this method of estimation gives only approximations, but the results are 



In- 
accurate enough for the purpose in hand. In this connection, it must be 
remembered that "before any community college is actually established, more 
detailed and accurate local studies and surveys will be required. 

Fifthly, potential enrollment in local community colleges was 
estimated for each area for the year 1966 — the year in which the baby 
cohort of 19*4-7 is expected to reach sophomore college age. In order to 
make these estimates of college enrollment, it was necessary to make 
several assumptions, as follows: (1) that at least 50 percent of the 
number of high school graduates in I965 would enter college somewhere; 
(2) of the number who enter college, at least 50 percent will enroll in 
a local community college; (3) that the total potential enrollment in 
the local community college, including new freshmen, sophomores, and 
retarded freshmen and sophomores, will be equal to twice the number of 
new or entering freshmen. 

The assumption that the proportion of high school graduates 
entering college is based on a projection of current trends as revealed 
by the Follow-Up Survey of High School Graduates, on the trend in the 
percent ratio of new freshmen in North Carolina colleges to the number 
of high school graduates, and, finally, on the belief that the presence 
of a community college will encourage more youth to attend college. 

The second assumption, that 50 percent of all local college 
students will begin their college careers in a local community college, 
is based on the fact that in practically every county in the state which 
now lias a public college more than fifty percent of the county's college 
students attend the local public college or colleges. In at least three 
counties (Hew Hanover, Watauga, and Jackson), the percentage goes 
to at least 75. 



15 
The third assumption is based on the fact that the presence of 
a public college is highly correlated with the percent of high school 
graduates in a county who attend college. As a matter of fact, it was 
found that, with other factors constant, the presence of a public college 
adds at least 6 percent to the proportion of high school graduates attend- 
ing college. 

Some less refined hut easy to understand statistics on the re- 
lationship of the presence of a public college to college enrollment of 
local youth is found in the following facts tased on the Follow-Up Survey 
of High School Graduates: 

In the 66 north Carolina counties with no college at all, only 

31.3 percent of the 1961 high school graduates entered college. 

In the 20 counties with only private colleges, 36.5 percent 
of the I96I high school graduates entered college. 

In the seven counties with only -Dublic colleges, 42.1 percent 
entered college. 

In the seven counties with "both public and private colleges, 

46. 4 percent of the high school graduates entered college. 

The assumption that about 50 percent of the high school gradu- 
ates entering college by 1966 may be a trifle on the high side, but the 
assumption that about 50 percent of students attending a local college is 
more than a trifle on the low side. Thus, the error in one assumption 
will tend to balance the error in the other, and the final result adds 
up to a conservative estimate. 

Individual 4rea Analysis 

Each area having a potential community college enrollment 
exceeding 300 students was studied as a unit. In this analysis, all 
relevant factors for which information was available were studied in re- 
lation to the establishment of a community college in the area. On the 



16 

basis of this intensive study, a descriptive and evaluative statement 

was prepared covering in general the following items: 

(1) Location, size, and limits of the area. 

(2) Population: total, increase, central city, urban, 

and nonwhite. 

(3) Highways and distances to other educational centers. 
(k) Per capita income and per capita state personal income 

taxes. 

(5) College-age population. 

(6) High school graduates and percent of graduates attending 

colleges. 

(7) Local colleges (if any): sources of their student bodies 

by county, and percent of local students attending 

the local colleges. 
(3) number of local residents attending college by location 

of college. 
(9) Rating of the county's relative ability to pay for 

building and operating a community college. 



17 
SUMMARY HIGHLIGHTS OF THE STUDY 

Heed for Additional College Facilities 

The increased need for college facilities is seen in the cur- 
rent and projected increases in the college-age population, in the number 
of high school graduates, and in the enrollment trends in the colleges 
and universities of llorth Carolina. The need for community colleges is 
related to the urbanization of the population and to the need for economy 
in providing additional dormitories and other college facilities. The 
establishment of community colleges is an effective means of increasing 
the percentage of high school graduates going to college and of lowering 
the cost of education for those who can commute to college. 

Trend in the College-Age Population 

The post-war Baby Boom, hitting its highest peak in 19^7, is 
partly responsible for the great increase in the number of young people 
seeking entrance to colleges and universities in ITorth Carolina and in 
the entire nation. 

In ITorth Carolina the college-age (18-21) population is ex- 
pected to increase from 288,000 in i960 to 333,000 in 1965 and to 
38^,000 in 1970, an increase of one- third during a ten- year period. 
The state's population 18-24 years of age is expected to increase from 
470,000 in i960 to 553,000 in I965 and 641,000 in 1970. But population 
increase is not the only cause of increasing college enrollment. An in- 
creasing percentage of this population is graduating from high school 
and an increasing percentage of high school graduates is going to college. 



18 

Trend in the ITumbcr of High School Graduates 

The i960 United States Census shows that since 1950 the number 

of high school graduates among the adult population of ITorth Carolina has 

increased from 413,150 to 744,217, an increase of 30 percent within ten 

short years] During the same ten years the total adult population in- 

4 

creased only 14 percent. 

The percent of ITorth Carolina adults who v/ere high school gradu- 
ates increased from 20.5 in 1950 to 32.3 in i960. In this respect, ITorth 
Carolina ranks 41st among the 50 states. During the same period the 
nation's percentage of high school graduates increased from 34.2 to 41.1. 

North Carolina public school statistics show that the number of 
high school graduates will continue to increase for many year3 — although 
a slight dip will occur in 1967 and 1968. Since 1950 the number of public 
high school graduates has increased by two-thirds — from 30,000 to 50,000. 
These statistics also shov; that the ratio of high school graduates to 
first graders 12 years prior is increasing two percentage points a year. 
In 1950 this ratio was only 21 percent; but in 1961 it vas 42 percent. 

Trend in College Enrollment 

The increase in the number of high school graduates is reflected 
directly and immediately in an increase in college enrollment. Hot only 
are more youth graduating from high school, but a higher percentage of 
those who do graduate is seeking admission to college. 

Between 1951 and I96I the fall enrollment in North Carolina 
colleges and universities increased from 40,708 to 75,201, a spectacular 
increase of 85 percent. This increase is even more remarkable because 



Adult population is here defined to include the population 
25 or more years of age. 



19 



0) 

u 

3 
00 

















r^ 


—i 


t— r-4 






r~- 


\r\ o^ 








-3- 


in • 


• • 


(\) 




^r 


cS-=* 








• 


OJ-H -d" -vO 


^t 


rvl 


• 


* « 








H 


+*t 


ITNJ- 




J- 


CO 
CO 


to d 

m a 








o 
o 


a) 
-p 




K 


-p 


4 


• o 


O 


c^ 




<H 


M 




a 


> 






■^ 


■3- 


Q 

3- 


C 


T3 












• 


• 




-P 


-p 


to a) 












<E 


*5* 


•H 

n 


ti 

o 


a » 

■H n) 
-a! W 




3 O 



TTT W 



4» 



5 

o 

■8 



V 
00 



o 



to 
W 
H 
< 
P 
Q 
< 



o 
o 
a 
u 

« 

O 

1— t 

X 

w 
Pi 

<! 

o 

3 

h 
O 
w 

< 
w 

w 

pej 
O 

o 

in 

IM 

Z 
O 

i — ) 

H 
<! 

P 
IX 

o 

Oh 
fa 

o 

H 

z 

w 
u 

PEi 

w 
a, 






+> 










cl 






CD 




CD 


O 




-P 


h 




cd 


a) 




■p 


a. 




W 


MA 




(1) 


• 




Xi 


CM 




Eh 


K> 


o 

CM 




ON -* 


u 




CM CV 


« 




I 1 

ITN O 


1 




CM 




CM 


!=> 




\\\ 






1 


8, 

a) 


l 






1 


-p 










a 






a 






o 






fc 






(D 






a. 








P< ON 


Jt 




3 KN 


KA 




3 




ir\ 


o 

KA 




CO 

g 

a 

CD 

CD 

J3 
+> 



<H 

a) 
-p 

-3 

a 
o 

tJ 

0) 
CO 

at 

m 



21 
the full impact of the 19V? Baby Boom year will not occur until I965 ! 

The 1961 fall enrollment was affected by the relatively large number of 

births in 19^3. but births receded some in 1944 and 1945- 

The proportion of Forth Carolina graduates entering college is 
rising more than one percentage point each year. In 196l, 3^-9 percent 
of Ilorth Carolina's high school graduates entered college. Comparable 
percentages by color were: white 39-31 nonwhite 28.9. The ratio of 
new college freshmen to high school graduates is also rising more than 
one percentage point each year. This ratio, which includes out-of-state 
students as well as freshmen \iho have delayed entering college one or 
more years, was 45»jS percent in 1961. Comparable ratios by color were: 
white 39.I and nonwhite 33.2. 

Because of the compound effect of high school graduation rates 
with college enrollment rates, the total enrollment in ITorth Carolina 
colleges is expected to zoom upward very rapidly in the next ten years. 
A very sudden increase will occur in the fall of 1965 when the children 
of the 1947 Baby Boom year reach 18 years of age. This tidal wave of 
freshmen Willi of course, take four or more years to reach the post- 
graduate college level. 

During the decade 1961 to 1971 the number of new freshmen is 
expected to increase from 22,800 in I96I to 30,900 in I965 to 35,450 in 
1971 and to about 40,000 in 1975. The total enrollment in North 
Carolina's colleges is expected to increase from 75t200 in 196I to about 
96,000 in 1965 to 118,000 in 1970 and to 140,000 in 1975- (These are 
averages of "low" and "high" projections.) 

Enrollment in the state's public colleges is expected to increase 
from 40,000 in 1961 to 53,000 in 1965 to 68,000 in 1970 and 83,900 in 1975. 



22 
School and College Attendance Rates 

School and college attendance rates in the state and the nation, 
as the following U. S. Census data show, have increased substantially 
since 1950 : 

United States Forth Carolina 



Age Class 


1950 


I960 


16-17 


74.5 


80.9 


18-19 


32.3 


42.1 


20-21 


I6.3 


21.1 


22-24 


10.7 


10.2 



I960 


I960 


65.7 


74.3 


31.3 


38.5 


13.3 


17-3 


7.6 5 


6.9 



No age-specific college attendance rates have "been published 
for either state or nation in i960, but the ratio of college enrollment 
to the college-age population is 50 -percent higher in the nation than in 
Horth Carolina. In i960, if the state ratio had been equal to that of 
the nation, Worth Carolina would have had about 95i°°0 college students 
instead of only 63,388. 

Factors Related to College Attendance 

Factors relc ted to college attendance are: occupation, urban 
residence and income status of parents; ability, high school record and 
motivation of students; and nearness to a college. 

In the 66 ITorth Carolina counties with no college at all, only 
31.3 percent of the 1961 high school graduates entered college. In the 
20 counties with only a private college, 36.5 percent of the high school 
graduates entered college; in the seven counties with only public col- 
leges, 42.1 percent of the high school graduates entered college; and 



^ The rates in 1950 for the 22-24 age class reflect a heavy loading 
of 5.1. 's whose education was delayed by the war. 



Figure 3 



23 



PERCENT OF POPULATION Z5 OR MORE YEARS OF AGE WHO ARE COLLEGE GRADUATES, I960 




/ Vt. 7 
1J.H. 7 
Mass. 8 
H.Is. 6 
Conn. 9 



Del. 10 
Md. 9 

Dist.of Col. 
11* 
'Jnited States 

7-7 
Alaska 9-5 
Hawaii 9.0 



Based on data from U. S. Bureau of the Census 



N. C. Agricultural Experiment Station 
DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY 



PERCENT OF POPULATION 25 OR MORE YEARS OF AGE WITH SOME COLLEGE EDUCATION, I960 




N.H. 15 
Vt. 16 
Mass. 18 
R.Is.13 
Conn. 18 



N.J. 16 

Del. 18 
Md. 17 

Dist.of Col. 25 
United States 

16. 5 
Alaska 22.4 
Hawaii 16.5 



Percentage 




| 20 up 


» 


14-16 








IS888SJ 17- 19 




Under 14 



Based on data from U. 3. Bureau of the Census 



N. C. Agricultural Experiment Station 
DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY 



Figure 4 



24 



PERCENT OF POPULATION 25 OR MORE YEARS OF AGE WHO ARE COLLEGE GRADUATES, 1960 




££&§ 



Perc 


entage 


The State 


222222S j 


^^^5 


6.9 Percer 








^*-7 







Based on data from U. S. Bureau of the Census 



N. C. Agricultural Experiment Station 
DEPARTMENT OF HURAL SOCIOLOGY 



PERCENT OF POPULATION 25 OR MORE YEARS OF AGE WITH SOME COLLEGE EDUCATION, 1960 



V I R G I N I A 




20 up 
17-19 
14-16 



Percentage The State 

11-15 15.4 Percent 



y m 




mi 







Under 8 



Ba3ed on data from U. S. Bureau of the Census 



N. C. Agricultural Experiment Station 

DEPAKTifcan: of hural sociology 



25 
in the seven counties with both public and private colleges, 46.4- percent 
of the high school graduates entered college. 

In several counties with Negro colleges, the percent of Negro 
high school graduates entering college is as high as the percent of white 
high school graduates entering college. However, because of other social 
and economic factors a lower percent of the Negro youth population fin- 
ishes high school. 

'Type and Location of Colleges 

North Carolina has 58 colleges and universities, three Bible 
colleges, and one theological seminary. Among the 58 colleges are: 

12 public senior colleges 

5 public junior colleges 

25 private senior colleges 

16 private junior colleges 

Twelve of the 58 colleges were established for and are still 
attended exclusively by Negroes. Of these 12 colleges, 6 are private 
senior colleges, 5 are public senior colleges, and one is a public junior 
college. Because of the growing trend toward desegregation, it is no 
longer realistic to classify many colleges, public or private, as exclu- 
sively "white". 

North Carolina's colleges, in terms of both geography and popu- 
lation, are not distributed economically and conveniently. Six large 
metropolitan counties have 26 of the 5& colleges; four other counties 
have two colleges each; 2k counties have one college each; and 66 
counties do not have any colleges. 

Fourteen of North Carolina's colleges are located in counties 
with less than. 50.0C0 population; six are located in areas with declining 



26 



un 
u 



O 

o 
ac 
u 



Q 
W 

hJ 

i-l 
O 
ai 

w 

Q 
O 

eel 

< 

?* OS 






< 

- 

2 



H 

z 

w 
u 

w 
a, 




4) 
U 
3 
00 



o 
so 



O 
O 

X 

u 
to 



Q 
w 
J 

o 

pej 

2 

W 

W 

< 

O 

X 

w 

s 

o 

< 

w 



I 

2 

H 

P 
0, 
O 

a 
o 

H 
2 
W 

w 




•••'■\-. v v.'.-..'.v^'-- : r , v.-.-.t'-J ? ^ - r v :-: 




i 

o 



a> 

1 



I 





0) 



is 

(X, 




m 

to 
S3 
a> 
o 

a> 

si 
■p 

<H 

o 

3 



o 

d 

I 

d 

o 

tJ 

a> 

m 
aS 
PP 



28 



E -S 
I =™ 

"If 



D 




29 
populations; and 20 are located in areas in which the population between 
1950 and i960 increased lees than the state increase. Of the state's kl 
private colleges, 23 are located either in large metropolitan areas which 
already have public colleges or in communities considered to "be too small 
for community colleges. Only ten of the 25 private senior colleges and 
only 4 of the 16 private junior colleges are located in communities consi- 
dered to be suitable for community colleges. Three of ITorth Carolina's 
public colleges are located in communities with populations too small for 
a community college. Also, seven of the state's 12 public senior colleges 
are too restricted in terms of race, sex, or curricula to serve community 
college functions. 

Location of Community College Areas 

On the basis of population, urban centers, and number of high 
school graduates, 55 ITorth Carolina areas were selected and studied as to 
possible locations for community colleges. Seven of these areas have po- 
tential community college enrollments in 1966 of less than 300 local stu- 
dents; eleven have enrollment potentials of from 3CO to 399 local students; 
and 37 have enrollment potentials of 400 or more local students. These 
enrollment potentials do not include students who would be taking noncollege 
industrial education courses. These estimates of enrollment potentials are 
based on two basic assumptions: (1) that the ratio of college freshmen to 
high school graduates in 1965 will be 50 percent; (2) that 50 percent of 
the college freshmen would enroll in a local community college, if available. 

Of the 37 community college areas with enrollment potentials ex- 
ceeding 40 u students, eleven already have public colleges, four of which 
are areas with public community colleges. Another of the 37 areas, Oaston 
County, has already been aop roved for the establishment of a public com- 
munity college. 



30 



oo 

H 
Pi 

D 
O 




31 
MAP OF COMMOiTITY COLLEGE AREAS 
Explanatory Remarks 

The map, on the opposite page, shows the first approximation to 
community college areas in llorth Carolina, and in no sense of the word does 
it represent firm and final recommendations for the establishment of com- 
munity colleges in every one of the areas, neither do the lines drawn 
around each area represent proposed legal or administrative limits. 

The red lines on the map do represent the areas from which a 
community college would draw most of its students, if it were in competi- 
tion with community colleges in adjoining areas. Of course, if community 
colleges should not "be established in every area, the colleges which are 
established would draw students from the noncollege areas; but, it has not 
been assumed that a community college would draw students from areas more 
than 25 miles from the college. 

The boundary lines to each area were used primarily as a means of 
making conservative and minimum estimates of potential enrollment in com- 
munity colleges located in or near the towns and cities indicated. It is 
assumed that students would, as now, be completely free to choose their 
college. Estimates of attendance were based, however, on the assumption 
that commuting students would probably, for obvious reasons, want to attend 
the nearest community college. In the peripheral areas between two col- 
leges, say A and 3, it is expected that just about as many students would 
go from area A to attend college B as would go from area B to attend col- 
lege A. Local road and highway systems, as well as natural barriers, would, 
of course, play an important part in actual community college attendance. 

It should be noted that many areas include all or parts of more 
than one county; but in a few cases, the community college area coincides 
almost exactly with county lines; e.g. Johnston, Guilford, 'Take, and Haywood. 



32 






31 »3* 

fl c o a ■£ 



1 -H +j © o 

1 CJ a 3rtvp 
■ c2 Tj Or- 



'■S a 



s°s 



ffl P. O (0 c 

a- id Chr 



o cm t- r> o Orj^MO O O CM O -%J 
O -OmmOO o« t~- r> S o o o o o 



■•jo^im -4003 010 -~* cm to o co 
^N^-ao ra to r> r> O -3 en cm cm r- 
MAITilAlft -* -j -* -* -J -3- -J -j -* -4 



— -^ o to a- o 

t- O i- CD -jco 

•— ■* > O >£ J c, 

TO r- cm rv C 

«—» T> O O ,— . .- 



iOOO cm o cm o cm 

I CM CM O O TO rnCO -J 

: O to « -^ o cm m r- 



I ? I ! : £ ! I 






131 : -• 

13 I IS 



I S3 I ^ 



- a- o o to -* i 



si!' 



I I ? I I 



-3 -} rn tM CM 



I I 



:*£! i 






O I I O 

O I I -J 1 

-j j } oi 



to r- c- o 

— r: co cm r» 



O CM m a- Q t-to 
I- O t- O 3 r- r- 



> CD nf CO O *tff'(",On O ->TO m TO 



-"■ CO > 



m o <» o r- 



li cm cm m ifr 



vJO -JO (M 






^f• sfsf r-\Ofto- 



CM Q t> O m 
O O m m rn 

cm cm cm cm rj 



I I N . I 1 

I I 5 I 3 



I IB Itf 

I I CM 1 



sD«nOTi> 



O CM U"i <n rn 



^ r- -j -j- -j- o 

«- t^OvO^O TO O i 



O r- t> t> CM 

c> y o c^ o 



> <n CM CM CM 



? .fij *rf W *° O -J fn O •< 

At- O r- en m t- t- cm i- 



OJM.-\flO 

o cm r> sf "> 
to o to to co 



m l- r- -J CO O rn 
-J-TO >^0 C-. CM 

to o co o co o r- 



O O r> CMO iTi-J-i-QO O CO mO^ m m CO O CT- TO in v- en m CM 

cm m o to O gdirif ^\ fl ^rvii-i \}*o^c- o r; j} r- to 

■JnOND CM CT> in CM CM <n O (VO^fl vfi O fT* TO >J CO i-0> iAO<n 



o r- r> r> o 






O T» «N Ci O 



co c- a m cm 



-e- 1> & to £? 

O O O en CM 



CO CO O sf -t 
O O O O O 



O -J O"- D -1 O 



cm tv o cr* 3 
O O O m m 



cnt> r-o o 



(^rjr^cvn 



3S38S 

in ir\ ir\ m ■<)■ 



too i^f-d 

m -J -* -J- -1" 



TO en m O t- 
en C- -st (f- CO 



O TO O O O*- CM f- CO t"- O O u 



CM CM CM CM C 



o o rn c> o-> o-*toc-co ^t 
-* r- nf en « ,-^ ^} r> r- o e3 
OO O t- CM ^r-rOvO t-OCO 



j r> »- o r> o o- 



t> TO CM O CM en r- O r- t- 
-4->A vf -*cn -*in -4 -Jsfr^cW 



O en CM O O 



r\ CM IT\ Q 

(A N iT ,f^ r 



PV CM -J r~ CN' 



9nr-r-" 
tC c^\ 1A in 



1 cn p"\ CM Or 



■sfr^tOT-W> e\t-T-T-CT- -JOvDCOC- OfMCMO-J CMt~-sO<DC^ 
-"- -J--J«£>P",tO C'J-vl-COCOr- lAt^OJOOJ CMCMr-r-rr\ COO-JtOCM 

OJfMOr-CM CO tMO r- O OOvOCOO sftOOJi^r 



O t> r^, C> 0-- 



O-st r-CT'sL>T-T- CMC-Ot-CT- 



J r- t- CM r- 



t- co r- -to 



O O O CO C 
C- 0» O r 



-\c-t~op- p-oo>no 



51™ 
■II* 

*3 O 

3 a t- 



"3 I -H _ 



o ovrc 
a. a. u i- 



*> 3 o o 

o anif 

E- O +J t- 



fMO'CMOt- ot>fn<r\T- omoo-j- QrNrja> ritoor-g 
-^-4mr\>nin fflvO-r-r, ot-p-\c\r> QOOCMin r-fMr-'nc 
O CMC>0^-4-in ocmOu~>o inCMOOr- fro ^|F|C^ i^O«fi\- 



J * S 3m 



•— l/\ o O O 

c> t> to r> to 

-*T- o 1- o 



O r^ in O f\ 

t- r- in m o 
O O TO O m 



t- in <r- rn c 
-*m t- TO c 



n-1 O p^ i— CT> 



O0*-t-OO -Jt-O-^CO r^inooco CO OJ CO CM O -^JOmfM-J- 

-*orja-m oc^cocy'CM t-c^otocm cocoor-o -ico r NO 
rjcMCM t- cm cm m .^-sfr-T--^ inr^\r-m cM-^-eMr--j- 



CT> t> CM t- -4 

o o o r- cm 



TO O C^ O CM 



c^in-\-^00 i£) vJOCO r -J-OOC'TO CMTOinCCO 
) TO 

cn -j cm 



O O O r^i c 

TO O Q mO- 
c- o o -4->n 



- TO t> t- 0*> CM O O"' 



-V O r- O O 

J m -? t- O 
J CM CM CM CM 



r^-4-OCMO OC-i—OO r^^-r-OCT' Or-C-OfM 

OONCMTO-J O^cnCMOm r-O-d-OO C^TOt-OO- 

rOir nr r Nr- m CMCMt- t- CM Cv 



-j^jmcMO o -Jntoo Of>a"«0<n rncoom'n (MO-^-d-cn 
O r- n-, CD t- OOOOn-\ r-TOO'no -i-jn-JO incMCM-^^I 
ininr-<>T- O H tV t- ff 1 CMOOO~>-4■ OOO.'-I"? CO vr. O cn CM 



> O S CM -J- 



jo>-to-j -t-iOt-w oot-or- -tcMoor- 
c3TOmCMO rnc-\TOtorr r>cMr~o ■ i 
M7-OW>} tOfnOr-O f--' 



1-r-SlCl T-CMCT-t-tO OCM-tO 



t o o t- en 



— -t-O^C^C-O -40>-4t>CM 



It-Ot-O mt>-OC-co -»j-Oin-ji- 

I UMT-O O t-CMOOt- O-^Jr^iCOO 



in to cm C- en 

t- CO CM CM m 



O O co en en O c 

CM r- r- *- -Ji 



- -j C~- mco O r 



- cm r~ d -* 

to" in -j cj cm 



o o o o 

O mo cm 



OOr-T-c- -jmocMTO 



O -J rn TO T- 

5* en rn -J O 

O O -^ m O 



o> O^ 0> m (M 



i cm q rj Orn- 

> i- TO O CM -^ C 

i o -tt- o- c3 r 



- rn O "4- ua 



Ch i^topo mOt>OCM rncnCnin<T> -*mtnr--J mm-npT- 

fticoff-o otSo-d-"- cJSto to sf c-rs^^o •oct'-jn-j 
o^r-T-TOco nr-if\0O -^c>r>T-r> oc-oocm cmp-o^oto 



o-. r- t- 



JP T3 CD d 

C M J3 Xi rH <a 

OO-PBC !,£ E 

aMSiOO OOS3 

2 o&-mo 3 m O U Q 



C 3 O 

3 t- c 

*>3§r 

3 +J Xl S (I) 

UtI an d 
^ a. o <s e 



c 3 o cm 3 D. 

^ -h > &H cj g D g - 

o o d <o -h o d 

« o o 3 ^ « > 



« S 



O 03 C CD m 

- > St) S 

d 3 <u £ 

k O H£ 



\ e- -j-cT- o co t 



J o c o 



■as 

a b © j 



© U TO O 

+j o f ■-• d 

o n H h 2 

-H C *J > O 

|j o g a> -u 

'J U "J < 13 



cm us ,6 co 

c^ od co i-j fl o m r-t c 

Ot ■f" rH Orl Q (j 0) HO O 

x; +j d tu-H t3 f-i ji-<+j oji -ho) t.a 

60 C +J G S C>hQ-H ot- box* >H > t. tn o o 

-Hd+JOd tHGoB> L.C0CID-H ojfDXt^-iJ 

oooo-PX Eooxjjr; Xi+J-H-OD: 'd'OH j n 

H 1. ti t fc H li Cd (1 Q-H>CrH t( C OJi c 

d _Q 03 (T, H -Hl-Ot.d 3x!qO« OCDXloJ-rJ 

C^Qu^cS 3000= 0.3-JO2 cc:3:tQ-aii«: 

OOTOCJO r- (Vn sfA or-tooo r- CM <n ■** m 

r- l-T-T-*-r- T-r-T-r-ni OJOVCMCMCM 



C J, -H CD 

U 3 > -rl 

G CJ ^3 m <h 

O co <n e J 

3 = CO TO W 

o t- to o^ o 

CM CM r-j cm m 



'd *j d -h I 
=: to ffi e " 






l< Cf U P. rHoSr-l flShJd(0 +>OG(h-. 

Cmtnioe qri u ao ol So a h o-Pdccn 

3 O DTJ 3 S O it 7 II t-djadrg O -ri t. J3 i 

ti^o-xcjto odsqJ t-'EcS'^D- uiXoo; 






X3 -H h O 

■P d iu o -*j 

g w o» x) a 

Q rH X 3 rH 



>>3 



l£Sa 



o dro.n;qo -h u ob 

I s e,na-s s e ie-s 

d L. O 3 Q d G, £t 3 d 

TO (C3WOE H U O X X 

in OP-coOO i-CMm-j-u 

--1 -j-j-J-fin ininininu 



33 
STATISTICAL TATA 017 OOHHDHITT COLLEGE AEEAS 
Explanatory Motes 

Table 1 provides 17 items of information for each of 5$ delin- 
eated, community college areas. Fifty— three of these areas are shown on 
the attached map. All columns show area data except 13, 14, and 15, 
captioned "County residents in college, 1 ,' "In-county enrollment," and 
"Local enrollment index" which are "based only on central county statistics. 

Column 3, "Pop. central ci ty- townships, " shows not only the pop- 
ulation of each central city but also its urban fringe consisting princi- 
pally of the population of the township or townships in which the central 
city is located. Column 7» "Per capita income tax," refers to per capita 
state personal income tax. 

Columns 10 and 11, "High school graduates 1961, 1965" are area 
estimates based on county enrollment data furnished by the State Depart- 
ment of public Instruction. Column 12, "Percent high school graduates in 
college" is "based on the 1961 Follow-Up Survey of High School Graduates 
made by the State Department of public Instruction. 

Columns 13, 14, and 1$, showing county residents in college, in- 
county enrollment, and the local enrollment index are based on the Hillman 
Survey made under the auspices of the State Board of Higher Education in 
i960. "County residents in college" includes all college students who live 
in an area's central county and who attend college anywhere in Uorth 
Carolina including the central county. The "in-county" enrollment includes 
only those residents of the county who attend college within the central 
county of an area. 

The "Local enrollment index" is based on the ratio of actual in- 
county enrollment to the expected in-county enrollment. The expected in- 
county enrollment in the case of a county with a senior college is 50 per- 
cent of the number of county residents enrolled in some Uorth Carolina 
college; but, in the case of a county with only a junior college, the 
expected enrollment is assumed to be only 3I.5 percent of the number of 
county residents in college. 

Column 16, "Potential enrollment I966," is based on the expected 
number of high school graduates in 1965 and applies only to potential 
enrollment of freshmen end sophomores in an area's colleges. It is assumed 
that 50 percent of an area's high school graduates will attend college and 
that 50 percent of those who attend college will attend college in the 
local area, if it should have either a public community college or a public 
senior college. The year 1966 is used because by that time the full impact 
of the 1947 baby boom will have reached the sophomore year in college. 
"Fall" enrollment is assumed. 



3 4 

High Priority Counties 

Of the 25 regaining areas, eleven have one or more private col- 
leges located in the central count}' of each area. Private senior colleges 
are located in eight of the eleven central counties, and private junior 
colleges are located in only three of the central counties. This leaves 
only fourteen areas v;ith enrollment potentials of over 400 students and 
with no competing public or private colleges. These fourteen areas with 
population and enrollment potentials are: 



Central City 
and County 



-iorganton, Burke County 
Y/hiteville, Columbus County 
Lexington, Davidson County 
Ilorth Wilkesboro, Wilkes County 
Reidsville, Rockingham County 
Henderson, Vance County 
Asheboro, Randolph County 
Kins ton, Lenoir County 
Hew Bern, Craven County 
Smithfield, Johnston County 
VJeldon, Halifax County 
Rutherfordton, Rutherford County 
Rockingham, Richmond County 
Mount Airy, Surry County 

In addition to the fourteen areas listed above, there are a 
number of areas with large populations, with high community college en- 
rollment potentials, in which the private colleges either (1) would not 



Population of 


En 


roilment 


Total Area 


Pote 


ntial 1966 


106,363 




812 


72,662 




606 


73,012 




586 


72,102 




5L16 


79,920 




531 


76,043 




524 


71,052 




504 


73.095 




502 


75,323 




450 


57,915 




466 


65,939 




444 


59,108 




428 


57,393 




426 


55,365 




409 



35 



"be adversely affected by a public junior college, or (2-) are not meeting 
the local need for a community college. 

The following is a list of eight areas with private senior col- 
leges in which community colleges would likely succeed without adversely 
affecting the private senior colleges. Although these senior colleges 
might lose some freshmen and sophomores to the public junior college, they 
would likely gain many juniors, seniors, and graduate students. 



Central City 
and County 



Private College 
Lenoir Hhyne 
Barber-Scotia 



iTewton, Catawba 
Concord, Cabarrus 
Burlington, Alamance Elon 
Nashville, Hash Wesleyan 
Wilson, Wilson 
Salisbury, Rowan 
Albemarle, Stanly 
Lillington, Harnett 



Atlantic Christian 
Catawba, Livingstone 
Pfeiffer 
Campbell 



Percent of 

i 

6 



Popula- 


Enroll- 


County's 


tion of 


ment 


Students in 


Total 


Poten- 


Local Private 


Area 


tial 


College 1960-61 


100,453 


747 


41.4 


91,209 


692 


7.3 


96,273 


670 


29.4 


82,502 


654 


4.5 


63, 957 


434 


41.7 


77,979 


478 


35.0 


55,755 


432 


24.4 


55,369 


418 


34.7 



In only Wilson, Catawba, Rowan and Harnett are the private senior 
colleges meeting a moderate percent of the local need — as shown by the 
percentages in the last column. Wesleyan College of Rocky Mount in i960 
had not been open long enough to enroll a larger percentage of local youth. 
Community colleges should be considered seriously for Cabarrus, Stanly, find 
Alamance Counties. All of these private college areas deserve further 
study. Judging from experiences with public colleges in Pitt, Hew Hanover, 
Watauga, Jackson, Orange, Wake, and Guilford Counties, public colleges in 



6. 



Hillman Survey, i960. 



36 

the above listed private senior college areas would "bring about a much 

higher enrollment of local students in the areas. 

In three areas with high potential local enrollment, there are 
three private junior colleges; the Cleveland, Iredell, and Wayne County- 
Areas with Gardner-Uebb, Mitchell, and Mount Olive private junior col- 
leges. Only in Cleveland County is the private college enrolling a 
moderate percentage of the local college students. 

Low Priority Areas 

The classification of an area in the high priority group does 
not guarantee the success cf its community college, nor does the classi- 
fication of an area in the low priority class mean that its community 
college would be a failure. Many other factors are involved. 

In six areas with potential enrollments of 300-399 students 
in I966, there are no private colleges. These are: Edgecombe, Onslow, 
Duplin, Lee, Haywood, and Moore County Areas. Of these six, Lee and 
Haywood should be given the highest priority because of urban popula- 
tion and income levels. 

In four areas with potential enrollments of 300-399 students, 
there are four private junior colleges: Hertford (Chowan College), 
Sampson (Pineland-EMI) , Union (V'ingate) , and Transylvania (Brevard). 
In Union and Transylvania the private colleges enroll a moderate per- 
centage of the local students. Pineland-EMI enrolls five percent and 
Chowan enrolls 16 percent of the local college students. 

Total and Additional Enrollment Expected 

If fifteen new community colleges , including G-astonia College, 
were to be established, a total additional population of 1,135.000 would 



37 
be served and the 1966 potential enrollment in these colleges would he 
about 6,300, of which about 30 percent would not be attending college 
under present conditions. If these colleges should not be established, 
it will be necessary for the state to provide dormitory space and other 
facilities at existing colleges at a total cost of from twenty-five to 
thirty million dollars, and individual students involved will have to 
pay about four million additional dollars per annum in order to attend 
college away from home. 

If community colleges were to be established in all 26 areas 
having a 400 plus enrollment potential, the total enrollment potential 
in North Carolina's community colleges, including those already estab- 
lished, would rise to 18,000 of which 14,400 would be in the 26 new col- 
leges. These 26 colleges would serve a total population of about 1,981,000. 

If community colleges were to be established in all 36 areas 
having 300 "jIus enrollment -potential , the total enrollment in ITorth 
Carolina's community colleges would rise to about 22,400 and about 

30 percent of these students would not otherwise have an opportunity to 
attend college. 

Industrial Education Centers 

The combination of industrial education centers with community 
colleges will potentially more than double the enrollment in comprehensive 
community colleges, but many students will not be high school graduates 
and will not be taking college level courses. Industrial education cen- 
ters are already located in four of the fourteen high priority community 
college areas. There is also an industrial education center in Oaston 

County. 

In the ten high priority counties without industrial education 

centers comprehensive community colleges would be established. In each 



38 

of the four remaining centers the existing industrial education center 

would become the nucleus of a comprehensive community college. 

Senior College Service Areas 

Senior colleges have been proposed for three metropolitan areas 
of the state: Charlotte, Wilmington, and Asheville. Enrollment potentials 
at these proposed institutions are summarized below: 

Charlotte Area . A population of about ii-68,000 lives " r ithin a 
commuting radius of 30 miles of Charlotte. By 19&.5 t!ie 18-21 college-age 
population is expected to reach 34,000; the number of high school gradu- 
ates is expected to reach 6,500 annually; and the number of college fresh- 
men from the area should reach about 3,700. 

If a public senior college, catering only to commuting students, 
should be established in the area, it is estimated that its total ^year 
undergraduate enrollment should reach at least 3,000 students by the 
school year 1969-70. This estimate is based on the assumptions that: 
(1) 57 percent of the Area's high school graduates will enter some col- 
lege; (2) 50 percent of the Area's college students will attend some 
college in the Area; and (3) 50 percent of the students enrolled in the 
local colleges will attend the proposed new public senior college. 

Wilmington Area . Approximately 100,000 people live within a 
commuting radius of 30 miles of Wilmington. By 1965 the 18-21 college- 
age population of the Wilmington Area is expected to reach 6,900, and 
the number of high school graduates should reach about 1, UO0 annually. 
If a public senior college were established in Wilmington, its I966 po- 
tential enrollment on a commuting basis should exceed 1,000 and should 
exceed 1,500 by the year 1969-70. This estimate is based on the fact 
that there are no private colleges in or near Wilmington and on the 



39 

assumptions that: (1) $0 percent of the high school graduates will 
enter some college; and (2) 75 percent of those entering college will 
attend Wilmington College. 

Asheville Area . A population of about 220,000 people live 
within a 30-mile commuting radius of Asheville. By 19&5 the 18-21 
college-age population of this Area is expected to reach about 14,000; 
and the number of high school graduates is expected to exceed 3,000. 
If a public senior college catering only to commuting students were to 
be established at .asheville, its enrollment would likely exceed 1,200 
by the year 1969-70. This estimate is based on the assumptions that: 
(1) by 1965, 45 percent of the local high school graduates will enter 
some college; and (2) 50 percent of those who enter college will enroll 
in the local public senior college. The estimate is low and on the con- 
servative side because: (1) present enrollment in the Asheville-Biltmore 
College is somewhat below expectations; and (2) the local college popula- 
tion must be shared with V/arren Wilson, IIontreat-Anderson, Mars Hill, and 

'festern Carolina College. 

In addition to the above -proposed metropolitan senior college 
areas, several other metropolitan areas which already have one or more 
public colleges were evaluated in terms of reorientation of curricula 
and for removing enrollment limitations in terms of race and sex. A 
summary of enrollment. statistics for these areas is presented below: 

Greensboro Area . As a local community college area the 
Greensboro Area has a population of about 240,000, being principally the 
population of Guilford County. By the year 1965, this area's 18-21 col- 
lege-age populption is expected to exceed 18,000 and its number of high 
school graduates will exceed 3,000 annually. This output of local high 



ifO 

school graduates will lead to a total undergraduate enrollment in some 

colleges of about ij.,300 students — as co:npared with about 2,600 in i960. 

Two public senior colleges in G-reensboro, Woman's College and 
A. & T. College, in I96I enrolled about 57 percent of the total enroll- 
ment in the eight colleges of the area. ITeither of these public colleges 
currently is enrolling undergraduate white men. If either or both of 
these units were reoriented to meet the needs of white men within commu- 
ting distance, it is estimated that they vrould increase their enrollments 
of local students by about 60 percent. In i960 these two schools enrolled 
533 students from Guilford County; and by 1969-70, if the schools should 
be open to all students without regard to race, they should enroll at 
least 1,500 of the 2,400 projected local students. 

The Raleigh Area . This Area, which for all practical purposes 
includes Wake County, had in i960 a population of 169,082. By I965 its 
18-21 college-age population is expected to reach 13,500, and its high 
school graduating class should exceed 1,900. This output of high school 
graduates will lead to an enrollment of 3,650 Wake County residents in 
some college by the year 1969-70. If the curricula of State College 
should be broadened to include liberal arts, it is estimated that the 
enrollment of Wake County residents in Raleigh's six colleges would in- 
crease from 1,378 in i960 to about 2,800 in 1969-70. It is also esti- 
mated that about 75 percent of this local enrollment would go to State 
College; and, if this should occur, the enrollment of Wake County stu- 
dents in State College would increase from 684 in i960 to 2,100 in 
1969-70. It is estimated that about 700 of these commuting students 
would be women. 

The Winston-Salem Area . In i960 the total population of this 
Area was 219,000. By 1965i the Area's 18-21 college-age population is 



kl 

expected to reach 16,600; and its number of high school graduates is ex- 
pected to exceed 2,600. The only public college in the Area is Winston- 
Salem Teachers College attended exclusively "by ilegro students. Because of 
the limited oooortunity for white students to attend a public college in 
this Area, the colleges of Winston-Salem enroll an unusually low percentage 
of the Area's residents who attend college somewhere. In i960 only 662, 
or Jk. k- percent of Eorsyth County's college students attended the three lo- 
cal colleges. If a local public college were available to all students 
regardless of race and sex, well over 50 percent of the Area's college 
students would attend local colleges. A similar problem exists to some 
degree in other ITegro college centers, such as Durham, Eayetteville, and 
Elizabeth City. This suggests that the conversion of Winston-Salem 
Teachers College to a college serving all races would provide more educa- 
tional opportunity for local residents. 

Impact on Private College Enrollment 

The establishment of new community colleges will have some 
effect on the enrollment of existing colleges both public and private, 
junior and senior; but, because of the rapidly increasing enrollment in 
all types of colleges, the impact will be much less than lias been feared. 
Some facts relating to this problem are: 

(1) Expected enrollment in the proposed 15 new community col- 
leges in i960 is 8,300, but the expected increase in the number of under- 
graduate college students between 1961 and i960 is about 23,000 and the 
expected incree.se of freshmen and aohpomores is about l6,i)O0. 

(2) There are no private colleges located in the central 
counties of the fourteen high priority areas, and there are only three 
private junior colleges in the central counties of the 26 areas having 



a ',-OO-plus enrollment potential. Nine private senior colleges are lo- 
cated in these26 central counties. 

(3) From the 15 high priority counties in I96& public colleges 
of the state enrolled 4,545 students, and private colleges enrolled 3.020 
students. Private junior colleges of the state in i960 enrolled 879 stu- 
dents from the 15 counties, and 12.7 percent 01" the enrollment of the 
private colleges came from the 15 counties as compared with: 9.0 per- 
cent in the case of the private senior colleges, and 12.7 in the case of 
all public colleges. Thus, the impact of the establishment of community 
colleges will be felt by public as well as private colleges. It is not 
likely, however, that either public or private colleges will lose all of 
their share of the students from these counties. 

(4) In eight counties served by nine private senior colleges 

in i960, only 26.4 percent of the college students attended the local pri- 
vate colleges, but in five counties served by public senior colleges 51*2 
percent of the college students attended the local public colleges. 

(5) In eleven counties served by eleven private junior colleges, 
only 20.2 percent of the students attending ilorth Carolina colleges went 

to the local private junior colleges. On the other hand, Hew Hanover 
County, served by a public junior college, sent 47-3 percent of its local 
college students to the local community college. 

(6) In i960 the private junior colleges of the state obtained 
only 16.7 percent of their total enrollment from the counties in which 
they were located, as conroared with 71.4 percent in the case of five pub- 
lic junior cclleges. 

(7) The private senior colleges of the state, in I960, obtained 
I0.9 percent of their total enrollment from the counties in which they were 
located, as compared with 10.6 percent in the case of public senior colleges, 



(8) In i960, private colleges enrolled 40 percent and public 
colleges 60 percent of North Carolina residents attending North Carolina 
colleges but in the same year Uorth Carolina's private colleges enrolled 
over two- thirds of the out-of-state students attending north Carolina col- 
leges and the state's public colleges enrolled less than a third. About 
one-third of private college enrollment comes from outside the state as 
compared with less than one-sixth in the case of the state's public 
colleges. 

(9) Each of six private junior colleges, in i960, enrolled stu- 
dents from 50 or more North Carolina counties; six enrolled students from 
25 - ^9 counties; and four received students from less than 25 counties. 

(10) In i960, fifteen of Zh private senior colleges enrolled 
students from 50 or more counties and only three private senior colleges 
enrolled students from less than 25 counties. 

The above facts tend to indicate that competition between pub- 
lic and private colleges will be primarily on a state-wide basis as it 
has always been. Private colleges are not community colleges in terms of 
either the source of most of their students or in terms of the extent to 
which local communities send their students to them. 



45 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



47 



STATE TABLE 1. 


YEARS OP SCHOOL COMPLETED 


BY PERSONS 


25 OR 


MORE YEARS 


OP i£E, 




BY REGION, 


DIVISIOH, AND STATE — UNITED STATES, i960. 






Adult 

Popur- 






Cumulative Percen 


tage 




Region, 


Under 


H.S.Gra 


d. Some 


Coll. 


Seme Coll. 


Coll.Grad 


Division, 


lation 


8 


Or 


College 


G-rad.or -f 


-r 


& State 


[n 1000 'a 
99,438 


G-rades 
22.3 


More 


Or More 
16.5 


More 
7.7 


H.S.Grad. 
40.1 


Some Coll 


United States 


41.1 


46.7 


Regions: 
















Northeast 


26,413 


19.8 


41.0 


15.8 


8.1 


38.5 


51.3 


iTorth Central 


23,697 


17.3 


41.8 


15.5 


6.9 


37.1 


44.5 


South 


28, 976 


33.3 


35.3 


15.0 


7.1 


42.5 


47.3 


West 


15,352 


14.6 


50.9 


22.3 


9.6 


43.8 


43.O 


Divisions: 
















Hew England 


6,083 


17.8 


44.6 


17-3 


8.4 


38.8 


148.6 


Mid.Atlantic 


20,330 


20.3 


39-9 


15.3 


8.0 


38.3 


52.3 


East N. Central 


20,128 


17.7 


41.2 


15.0 


6.9 


36.4 


46.0 


West IT. Central 


8,569 


16.1 


42.9 


16.4 


6.8 


38.2 


41.5 


South Atlantic 


13. ?85 


33.2 


36.6 


15.7 


7.6 


42.9 


48.4 


East S. Central 


6,257 


36.O 


29.5 


11.8 


5.4 


40.0 


45.8 


West S. Central 


8.934- 


31.7 


37.2 


16.2 


7.4 


43.5 


45.7 


Mountain 


3.^97 


13.2 


49.7 


21.6 


9.3 


43.5 


43.1 


Pacific 


11,856 


14.4 


51.1 


22.4 


9.6 


43.8 


42.9 


States: 
















Hew England: 
















Maine 


534 


15.8 


4-3-3 


14.2 


5.5 


32.8 


38.7 


ITew Hampshire 


345 


16.4 


42.9 


15.7 


7.1 


36.6 


45.2 


Vermont 


213 


14.6 


42.8 


16.8 


7.3 


39-3 


43.5 


Massachusetts 


3.011 


17-3 


47.0 


18.2 


8.8 


38.7 


43.4 


Rhode Island 


498 


23.5 


35-0 


13.2 


6.6 


37.7 


50.0 


Connecticut 


1,482 


I8.5 


43.9 


18.4 


9-5 


41.9 


51.6 


Mid. Atlantic 
















Hew York 


10,124 


19.5 


40.8 


16.8 


8.9 


41.2 


53-0 


Hew Jersey- 


3, 600 


20.6 


40.7 


16.1 


8.4 


39-6 


52.2 


Pennsylvania 


6,606 


21.6 


38.1 


12.6 


6.4 


33-1 


50.8 


East N. Central: 
















Ohio 


5.378 


17.7 


42.0 


14.7 


7.0 


35.0 


47.6 


Indiana 


2,550 


16.9 


41.8 


13.7 


6.3 


32.8 


46.0 


Illinois 


5,808 


18.1 


40.4 


15.9 


7.3 


39.4 


45.9 


Michigan 


4,217 


17.5 


40.9 


14.9 


6.8 


36.4 


45.6 


Wisconsin 


2,175 


17.7 


41.6 


15.4 


6.7 


37-0 


43.5 


West II. Central: 
















Minnesota 


1,845 


14.6 


43.9 


17.9 


7.5 


40.8 


41.9 


Iowa 


1,541 


13.7 


46.3 


16.0 


6.4 


34.6 


40.0 


Missouri 


2,493 


21.5 


36.6 


14.0 


6.2 


38.3 


44.3 


North Dakota 


324 


18. 3 


38.9 


17.0 


5-6 


43.7 


32.9 


South Dakota 


360 


13.8 


42.1 


17.1 


5.7 


40.6 


33-3 


Uehraska 


791 


12.2 


47.7 


17.4 


6.8 


36.5 


39.1 


Kansas 


1,216 


13.1 


48.2 


I8.9 


8.2 


39.2 


43.4 



AB 



STATE TABLE 1. 
(continued) 



YEARS OF SCHOOL COiPLSTED BY PERSONS 25 OR MORE YEARS OF AGE, 
BY REGIOH, BIVISIOU, AND STATE — UNITED STATES, i960. 



Region, 
Division, 
& State 

States: 



Adult 

Popu- Under 
lation 8 

In 1000' s Grades 



Cumulative Percentage 



H.S.Grad. Some Coll. Some Coll. Coll. Grad. 
Or College Grad. or •£ t 

More Or More More H.S.Grad. Some Coll. 



South Atlantic: 

Delaware 246 19. 7 

Maryland 1,693 27.3 

Dist.of Columbia 46 1 21.2 

Virginia 2,083 36.4 

West Virginia 1,000 30.5 

North Carolina 2,307 41.5 

South Carolina LI36 43.4 

Georgia 2,015 40.2 

Florida 2,845 22.9 

East S. Central: 

Kentucky l,6l0 33.2 

Tennessee 1,912 34.8 

Alabama 1,670 33.5 

Mississippi 1,065 37.8 

West S. Central: 

Arkansas 964 34. 4 

Louisiana 1,639 41.9 

Oklahoma 1,300 23.4 

Texas 5,031 30.2 

Mountain: 

Montana 356 I3.3 

Idaho 340 10.7 

Wyoming 174 11. 7 

Colorado 941 I3.4 

New Mexico 445 24.2 

Arizona 661 20.9 

Utah 419 8.9 

Nevada 160 10 . 9 

Pacific: 

Washington 1,577 11.7 

Oregon 996 12.1 

California 8,869 14.6 

Alaska 105 15.7 

Hai/aii 309 26.6 



43.4 
40.0 
47.8 

37-9 
30.5 

32.3 
30.4 

31-9 

42.6 



27.6 
30.4 
30.4 
29.8 



28.9 

32.3 

40.5 
39.6 



47.8 
43.6 
52.1 
52.0 
45.4 
45.7 
55.3 
53.3 



51.5 

48.4 

51.5 
54.7 
46.1 



18.4 
17.3 
25.9 
17.2 
11.4 
13.4 
13.4 
13.5 
17.5 



11.1 
12.2 

11.8 
12.5 



11.0 

13.4 
17.6 
17.8 



19.7 
19.7 

21.0 
23.1 

20.6 
20.4 
25.2 
21.3 



21.0 
19.7 
23.2 
22.4 
I6.5 



10.1 
9.3 

14.3 
8.4 
5-2 
6.3 
6.9 
6.2 
7.8 



4.9 
5.5 
5.7 

5.6 



4.8 
6.7 
7-9 
8.0 



7.5 
7.2 

8.7 

10.7 

9.8 

9.1 

10.2 

8.3 



9.3 
5.5 
9.8 

9.5 

9.0 



42.4 

43.3 
54.2 
45.4 
37-4 
41.5 
44.1 
42.3 
41.1 



40.2 
40.1 
38.8 
41.9 



38.I 
41.5 

^3.5 

44.9 



41.2 
40.5 
40.3 
44.4 

45.4 
44-. 6 
45.2 
40.0 



40.8 
40.7 
45.0 
41.0 
35.8 



5^-9 
53.8 
55.2 

48.8 
45.6 
47.0 
51.5 
45.9 
44.6 



44.1 
45.1 

43.3 
44.8 



43.6 
50.0 
44.9 
44.9 



38.I 

36.5 
41.4 
46.3 
47-6 
44.6 
40.5 
39.0 



44.3 
43.I 
42.2 
42.4 

54.5 



Source: U. S. Census of Population, i960 — U. S. Summary, General Social 
and Economic Characteristics, PC(1) 1C U.S., Table 115. 



49 



COUNTY TABLE 1. COLLEGE-AGE (18-21) POPULATION BY COLOR ALL SEX IN 
NORTH CAROLINA COUNTIES, i960. 







MM 


te 


Nonwhi te 


County 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


North Carolina 


290,203 


115,340 


102,810 


36,447 


35,606 


Alamance 


4,625 


1,754 


1.931 


519 


421 


Alexander 


90O 


452 


449 


43 


36 


Alleghany- 


434 


213 


212 


2 


7 


Anson 


1,229 


321 


233 


299 


326 


as he 


1,105 


519 


530 


3 


3 


Avery 


954 


496 


448 


6 


4 


Beaufort 


1,626 


502 


503 


325 


296 


Bertie 


1,258 


248 


210 


411 


389 


Bladen 


1,526 


419 


429 


353 


325 


Brunswick 


1,087 


329 


340 


207 


211 


Buncombe 


6,237 


2,463 


3,155 


281 


338 


Burke 


2,889 


1,243 


1,436 


105 


105 


Cabarrus 


3,642 


1,331 


1,575 


276 


460 


Caldwell 


3,116 


1,435 


1,491 


99 


91 


Camden 


261 


78 


68 


48 


67 


Carteret 


2,833 


1,983 


604 


145 


101 


Caswell 


1,252 


318 


264 


341 


329 


Catawba 


4,409 


1,893 


2,101 


222 


193 


Chatham 


1,386 


418 


448 


280 


240 


Cherokee 


84-1 


421 


398 


12 


10 


Chowan 


540 


133 


130 


148 


129 


Clay 


262 


131 


129 


1 


1 


Cleveland 


3.837 


1,^33 


1,490 


453 


461 


Co lumbus 


2,605 


811 


341 


494 


459 


Craven 


4,708 


2,413 


1,307 


557 


431 


Cumberland 


17,295 


10,017 


3,684 


2,195 


1,399 


Curri tuck 


279 


95 


87 


43 


54 


Bare 


327 


174 


131 


12 


10 


Davidson 


4,391 


1,345 


2,007 


270 


269 


Davie 


087 


391 


368 


61 


67 


Duplin 


2,106 


631 


644 


414 


417 


Durham 


8,977 


3.225 


2,960 


1,167 


1,625 


Edgecombe 


2,722 


533 


632 


775 


782 


Forsyth 


11,274 


3,301 


4,617 


1,228 


1,628 


Franklin 


1,868 


634 


473 


385 


371 


Gas ton 


6,872 


2,905 


3,070 


432 


465 


Gates 


498 


96 


68 


174 


160 


Graham 


346 


175 


150 


9 


12 


Granville 


1,620 


491 


439 


468 


422 


Greene 


961 


223 


223 


262 


253 


Guilford 


16,236 


4,424 


7,597 


2,035 


2, ISO 


Halifax 


3,026 


547 


533 


943 


953 


Harnett 


3,305 


1,316 


1,190 


422 


377 


Haywood 


2,175 


9&4 


1,151 


25 


15 


Henderson 


1,764 


752 


907 


51 


54 


Hertford 


1,459 


430 


307 


378 


344 


Hoke 


933 


164 


170 


273 


326 


Hyde 


270 


60 


55 


87 


'68 


Iredell 


3,331 


1,200 


1,443 


329 


359 


Jackson 


1,661 


334 


721 


51 


55 



50 



C0U17TY TABLE 1. 
(continued) 



C0LLS0E-A3E (18-21) POPULATION BY COLOR AHD SEX IH 
NORTH CAROLINA COUMTES, i960. 



County 

Johnston 
Jones 
Lee 

Lenoir 
Lincoln 
McDowell 
Macon 
Madison 
Martin 
Mecklenburg 
Mi tclie 11 
Montgomery 
Moore 
Hash 

ITew Hanover 
Northampton 
Ons low 
Orange 
Pamlico 
Pasquotank 
Pender 
Perquimans 
Person 
Pitt 
Polk 
Randolph 
Ri chmond 
Roheson 
Rockingham 
Rowan 

Rutherford 
Sampson 
Scotland 
Stanly 
Stokes 
Surry- 
Swain 

Transylvania 
Tyrrell 
Union 
Vance 
Walce 
Warren 
Washington 
Watauga 
Wayne 
Wilkes 
Wilson 
Yadkin 
Yancey 



Total 

3,510 

613 

1,-126 

2,956 
1,66? 

1,465 

790 

1,784 

1,319 

14, 288 

739 

973 

1,903 

3-265 

3.699 

1.415 

16,163 

5,594 

472 

1,612 

922 

413 

l,46l 

5,593 
541 
3,291 
1,941 
5,333 
3,633 
4,472 

2,369 
2,573 
1,308 
2,340 

1,329 
2,637 

441 

1,173 

199 

3,032 

1,684 

12,500 

931 
592 

2,083 

4,991 
2,603 

3,545 

1,378 
817 



Whi 


te 


lion whi te 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


1.3W 


1,296 


458 


415 


147 


153 


144 


169 


506 


582 


162 


176 


803 


930 


582 


586 


703 


736 


124 


99 


666 


732 


30 


35 


406 


374 


7 


3 


936 


340 


7 


l 


305 


301 


366 


345 


4,548 


5,612 


1,955 


2,173 


352 


386 


1 


- 


1400 


333 


109 


131 


684 


672 


274 


273 


823 


957 


751 


73^ 


1,327 


1,394 


436 


5^-2 


204 


187 


539 


435 


11,975 


2,604 


1,198 


386 


3.457 


1,480 


352 


305 


144 


123 


109 


96 


364 


368 


391 


489 


217 


241 


247 


217 


107 


107 


108 


91 


458 


436 


272 


295 


1,714 


2,195 


858 


826 


255 


216 


37 


33 


1,405 


1,550 


189 


147 


594 


747 


302 


298 


1.085 


1,173 


1,585 


1,435 


1,286 


1,487 


419 


441 


1,636 


1,722 


560 


554 


983 


1,063 


170 


153 


837 


733 


491 


512 


3^9 


360 


302 


297 


1,041 


1,087 


109 


103 


620 


569 


72 


68 


1,205 


1,263 


88 


81 


161 


167 


51 


62 


523 


591 


30 


29 


44 


39 


59 


57 


1,244 


1,188 


303 


292 


449 


397 


431 


407 


5,008 


4,391 


1,442 


1,659 


129 


129 


357 


316 


147 


144 


168 


133 


859 


1,211 


5 


8 


1,804 


1,468 


912 


807 


1,268 


1,167 


94 


74 


1,000 


1,326 


633 


586 


671 


648 


30 


29 


434 


376 


2 


5 



Source: Estimates bo.sed on U.S. Census of Population I960, North Carolina, 
General Population Characteristics, PC(l), 35R, Tahle 27. 



COUNTY 'LiBLZ 2. POPULATION AGE 18-24 YEARS BY COLOR AND SEX IN 51 

NORTE CAROLINA COUNTIES, i960. 



Coimty Total 

North Carolina 472,234 

Alamance 7,9^4 

Alexander 1,561 

Alleghany 695 

Anson 1,908 

Ashe 1,789 

Avery 1,352 

Beaufort 2,728 

Bertie 2,001 

Bladen 2,389 

Brunswick 1,728 

Buncombe 10,512 

Burke 4, 962 

Cabarrus 6,145 

Caldwell 5,l64 

Camden 429 

Carteret 4,420 

Caswell 1,937 

Catawba 7,239 

Chatham 2,257 

Cherokee 1,352 

Chowan 692 

Clay 403 

Cleveland 6,096 

Co lumbus h, 241 

Craven 7,837 

Cumberland 29,010 

Currituck hh,} 

Dare 530 

Davidson 7,658 

Davie 1,534 

Duplin 3,438 

Durham Ik, 139 

Edgecombe 4,429 

Eorsyth 19,534 

Franklin 2, 73l 

Gaston 11,614 

Gates 770 

Graham 563 

Granville 3,005 

Greene -.533 

Guilford 26, 60? 

Halifax 4, 39L- 

Eamett 5,094 

Eaywood 3,765 

Henderson 2,397 

Hertford 2,154 

Hoke 1,490 

Hyde 426 



Iredell 5,67 

Jackson 2,397 



White 


Nonwh 


ite 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


185,894 


173,435 


56,377 


56,528 


3,042 


3,390 


732 


730 


730 


723 


68 


60 


336 


345 


2 


12 


437 


438 


450 


483 


835 


939 


9 


6 


691 


643 


12 


6 


870 


883 


478 


497 


394 


374 


612 


621 


655 


728 


503 


503 


522 


576 


314 


316 


4,145 


5,317 


483 


567 


2,133 


2,471 


174 


184 


2,302 


2,708 


436 


699 


2,347 


2,499 


160 


158 


122 


121 


79 


107 


2,931 


1,079 


253 


157 


466 


456 


513 


502 


3,130 


3,431 


340 


338 


698 


738 


437 


384 


666 


650 


21 


15 


218 


239 


221 


214 


202 


197 


3 


1 


2,265 


2,334 


669 


758 


1,342 


1,423 


738 


738 


3,887 


2,397 


864 


739 


16,538 


6,657 


3,505 


2,310 


149 


144 


63 


87 


264 


232 


19 


15 


3.179 


3.540 


477 


462 


663 


657 


100 


109 


1,066 


1,106 


658 


656 


5,138 


4,826 


1,779 


2,396 


923 


1,096 


1,173 


1,232 


6,721 


3,183 


2,053 


2,577 


936 


741 


553 


551 


4,850 


5,322 


682 


760 


151 


119 


256 


244 


273 


255 


12 


23 


019 


775 


723 


688 


373 


387 


398 


375 


7,909 


12,057 


3,210 


3,427 


934 


1,016 


1,476 


1,468 


1,946 


1,857 


671 


620 


1,696 


1,997 


42 


30 


I.236 


1,502 


77 


82 


575 


457 


580 


542 


236 


300 


418 


436 


102 


95 


120 


109 


2,103 


2,436 


564 


570 


1,203 


1,019 


83 


92 



52 



couitty Table 2. 

(continued) 



POPULATIOU AGE 18-24- YEARS 3Y COLOR AM) SEX IN 
ITORTH CAROLIiTA COUJTIES, i960. 



County 

Johns ton 

Jones 

lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

i loo re 
Nash 

Hew Hanover 

ilorthamnton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Total 

5,654 
958 
2,^84 
4,978 
2,712 
2,440 
1,276 

2,339 
2,208 
24, 896 
1,191 
1,535 
3,098 
5,236 
6,138 

2.193 

23, 241 

8,786 

757 

2,509 

1,4-64 

664 

2,362 

8,33^ 
882 

5.629 
3,109 
8,286 
6,218 
7,160 

3,857 

4,089 

2,070 

3,875 
2,222 

4,497 

708 

1,788 

311 

4,666 

2,699 
20,573 
1,431 
1,012 
2,816 
8,706 
4,325 
5,737 
2,307 
1,283 



Whit 


e 


ITonwhi te 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Pemale 


2,175 


2,155 


630 


644 


237 


255 


218 


248 


929 


1,020 


246 


289 


1,442 


1,730 


381 


925 


1,158 


1,212 


183 


159 


1,103 


1,224 


55 


58 


615 


643 


12 


6 


1,234 


1,091 


8 


6 


540 


570 


539 


559 


7,896 


10,184 


3,152 


3,664 


568 


620 


2 


1 


607 


543 


181 


204 


1,120 


1,155 


399 


424 


1,429 


1,640 


1,064 


1,103 


2,275 


2,321 


667 


875 


334 


323 


738 


743 


16,048 


4, 795 


1,726 


672 


5,003 


2,709 


552 


522 


214 


207 


169 


167 


624 


639 


564 


682 


358 


379 


380 


347 


166 


167 


172 


159 


73^ 


746 


432 


^50 


2,672 


3,076 


1,284 


1,302 


405 


364 


64 


49 


2,416 


2,701 


273 


239 


979 


1,217 


453 


460 


1,674 


1,867 


2,370 


2, 375 


2,254 


2,558 


678 


728 


2,614 


2,893 


621 


832 


1,617 


1,745 


253 


242 


1,330 


1,223 


742 


794 


555 


610 


451 


454 


1,762 


1,799 


153 


161 


1,010 


978 


116 


118 


2,043 


2,171 


143 


140 


249 


280 


76 


103 


808 


894 


43 


43 


65 


73 


88 


85 


1,869 


1,833 


491 


473 


685 


74-3 


640 


626 


8,212 


7,509 


2,326 


2,526 


213 


218 


520 


430 


236 


273 


273 


225 


1,245 


1,547 


11 


13 


3.212 


2,679 


1,498 


1,317 


2,025 


2,024 


150 


126 


1,699 


2,100 


997 


941 


1,124 


1,079 


55 


49 


651 


618 


5 


9 



Source: Estimates from the U.S. Census of Population, i960, Forth Carolina, 
General Population Characteristics, PC(1) 35B, Table 27. 



COUNTY TABLE 3. 



1965 PROJECTED COLLEGE- aGE POPULATION OP NORTE CAROLINA 
COUNTIES. AGES 18-24 







A^e 




1 
Counties 




Age 




Counties 


18-21 


22-24 


18-24 


13-21 


22-24 


18-24 


Total 


337,859 215,308 553,167 










Alamance 


5,977 


3,797 


9,774 


Johnston 


4,240 


2,716 


6,956 


Alexander 


1,106 


733 


1,839 


Jones 


748 


452 


1,200 


Alleghany- 


472 


309 


781 


Lee 


1,936 


1,284 


3,220 


Anson 


1,583 


957 


2,540 


Lenoir 


4,098 


2,616 


6,714 


Ashe 


1,218 


778 


1,996 


Lincoln 


1,956 


1,264 


3,220 


Avery 


840 


567 


1,407 


McDowell 


1,744 


1,144 


2,886 


Beaufort 


2,252 


1,360 


5,612 


Macon 


924 


623 


1,547 


Bertie 


i,54o 


944 


2,484 


Madison 


1,181 


646 


2,027 


Bladen 


1,978 


1,210 


3,188 


Martin 


1,810 


1,096 


2,906 


Brunswick 


1,366 


867 


2,233 


Meckl an burg 


20,922 


13,504 


34,426 


Buncombe 


7,994 


5,163 


13,157 


Mitchell 


694 


606 


1,500 


Burke 


3,704 


2,431 


6,155 


Montgomery 


1,217 


770 


1,937 


Cabarrus 


4,351 


2,840 


7,191 


Moore 


2,423 


1,588 


4,016 


Caldwell 


3,652 


2,435 


6,087 


Nash 


4,127 


2,547 


6,674 


Camden 


34-6 


226 


572 


New Hanover 


4,974 


3,240 


8,214 


Carteret 


2,38e 


1,986 


4,874 


Northampton 


1,766 


1,062 


2,828 


Caswell 


1,390 


656 


2,246 


Onslow 


12,500 


8,040 


20,540 


Catawba 


5,390 


3,535 


8,925 


Orange 


4,347 


2,772 


7,119 


Chatham 


1,824 


1,180 


3,oo4 


Parol ino 


612 


376 


988 


Cherokee 


1,050 


677 


1,727 


Pasquotank 


1,800 


1,102 


2,902 


Chowan 


722 


447 


1,169 


Pender 


1,217 


768 


1,985 


Clay 


340 


222 


562 


Perquimans 


548 


345 


893 


Cleveland 


4,^34 


2,847 


7,281 


Person 


1,794 


1,162 


2,956 


Columbus 


3,337 


2,093 


5,430 


Pitt 


5,220 


3,371 


3,591 


Craven 


4,754 


2,724 


7,478 


Polk 


669 


*55 


1,124 


Cumberland 


18,264 


10,460 


28,724 


Randolph 


4,342 


2,880 


7,222 


Currituck 


381 


256 


637 


Richmond 


2,550 


1,594 


4,144 


Dare 


340 


244 


584 


Robeson 


6,344 


3,886 


10,230 


Davidson 


5,964 


3,916 


9,380 


Rockingham 


4,363 


2,816 


7,179 


Davie 


1,078 


710 


1,788 


Rowan 


5,246 


3,457 


3,703 


Duplin 


2,688 


1,693 


4,381 


Rutherford 


2,792 


1,800 


4,592 


Durham 


&,734 


5,526 


14,260 


Sampson 


3,135 


1,971 


5,106 


Edgecombe 


3,663 


2,231 


5,894 


Scotland 


1,734 


1,026 


2,760 


Forsyth 


14,580 


9,596 


24,176 


Stanly 


2,816 


1,809 


4,625 


Franklin 


1,852 


1,199 


3,051 


Stokas 


1,479 


996 


2,475 


Gaston 


8,834 


5,722 


14,556 


Surry 


3,174 


2,070 


5,244 


Gates 


568 


363 


931 


Swain 


529 


350 


879 


Graham 


446 


289 


735 


Transylvania 


1,203 


825 


2,028 


Granville 


2,251 


1,438 


3,669 


Tyrrell 


268 


171 


439 


Greene 


1,144 


690 


1,834 


Union 


3,190 


2,110 


5,300 


Guilford 


ie,997 


12,215 


31,212 


Vance 


2,066 


1,293 


3,359 


Hal if ax 


3,944 


2,392 


6,356 


Wake 


13,536 


8,746 


22,282 


Harnett 


3,378 


2,245 


5,623 


Warren 


1,231 


712 


1,943 


Hay woo d 


2,645 


1,724 


4,369 


Washington 


871 


544 


1,415 


Henderson 


2,308 


1,532 


3,840 


Watauga 


1,319 


962 


2,281 


Hertford 


1,586 


1,011 


2,597 


Wayne 


6,371 


4,250 


10,621 


Hoke 


1,153 


682 


1,840 


Wilkes 


3,097 


2,026 


5,123 


Hyde 


312 


196 


5 08 


Wil son 


4,056 


2,595 


6,651 


Iredell 


4,121 


2,647 


6,768 


Yadkin 


1,492 


1,026 


2,518 


Jackson 


1,323 


907 


2,230 


Yancey 


1,916 


576 


2,492 



Source: Department of Rural Sociology, N. C. State College. 



5A 



COUNTY TABLE 4. 



1970 PROJECTED COLLEGE-aGE POPULATION OF NORTH CAROLINA 
COUNTIES. AGES 18-24 







Age 




Counties 




Age 




Counties 


18-21 


22-24 


18-24 


18-21 


22-24 


18-24 


Total 


383, 825 


256,708 


640,533 










Alamance 


6,932 


4,779 


11,711 


Johnston 


5,779 


2,244 


6,023 


Alexander 


1,061 


716 


1,777 


Jones 


722 


402 


1,124 


Alleghany 


424 


274 


698 


Lee 


1,987 


1,557 


5,544 


Anson 


1,466 


762 


2 , 228 


Lenoir 


4,552 


2,796 


7,528 


Ashe 


1,046 


645 


1,691 


Lincoln 


1,914 


1,257 


5,171 


Avery- 


718 


420 


1,138 


McDowell 


1,672 


1,055 


2,725 


Beaufort 


2,118 


1,202 


3,320 


Macon 


750 


456 


1,206 


Bertie 


1,406 


741 


2,147 


Madison 


1,053 


568 


1,621 


Bladen 


1,816 


954 


2,770 


Martin 


1,670 


904 


2,574 


Brunswick 


1,323 


770 


2,093 


Mecklenburg 


26,292 


18,480 


44,772 


Buncombe 


8,038 


5,313 


15,351 


Mitchell 


730 


452 


1,182 


Burke 


3,705 


2,630 


6,355 


Montgomery 


1,248 


750 


1,978 


Cabarrus 


4,565 


2,888 


7,455 


Moore 


2,546 


1,484 


4,030 


Caldwell 


3,718 


2,520 


6,258 


Nash 


4,028 


2,551 


6,559 


Camden 


362 


194 


556 


New Hanover 


5,266 


5,618 


8,834 


Carteret 


3,467 


2,754 


6,221 


Northampton 


1,676 


865 


2,559 


Caswell 


1,311 


774 


2,085 


Onslow 


25,526 


16,093 


59,419 


Catawba 


5,957 


4,029 


9,986 


Orange 


6,052 


4,820 


10,872 


Chatham 


1,663 


1,126 


2,789 


Pamlico 


591 


315 


904 


Cherokee 


806 


510 


1,516 


Pasquotank 


2,045 


1,362 


5,405 


Chowan 


696 


388 


1,084 


Pender 


1,141 


604 


1,745 


Clay 


266 


145 


411 


Perquimans 


518 


267 


785 


Cleveland 


4,377 


2,710 


7,087 


Person 


1,814 


1,069 


2,883 


Columbus 


3,060 


1,741 


4,801 


Pitt 


5,975 


3,551 


9,524 


Craven 


6,606 


4,845 


11,451 


Polk 


582 


346 


928 


Cumberland 


29,010 


23,054 


52,064 


Randolph 


4,688 


3,167 


7,855 


Currituck 


390 


214 


604 


Richmond 


2,475 


1,576 


5,851 


Bare 


350 


222 


572 


Robeson 


6,500 


3,536 


9,336 


Davidson 


6,718 


4,613 


11,551 


Rockingham 


4,565 


2,845 


7,408 


Davie 


1,116 


720 


1,856 


Rowan 


5,452 


3,472 


8,904 


Duplin 


2,515 


1,459 


3,974 


Rutherford 


2,555 


1,591 


4,126 


Durham 


10,724 


7,868 


18,592 


Sampson 


2,904 


1,637 


4,541 


Edgecombe 


3,847 


2,141 


5,988 


Scotland 


1,660 


920 


2,580 


Forsyth 


17,572 


12,854 


50,426 


Stanly 


2,945 


1,964 


4,909 


Franklin 


1,795 


955 


2,750 


Stokes 


1,448 


906 


2,354 


Gaston 


9,636 


6,264 


15,900 


Surry 


5,150 


2,053 


5,183 


Gates 


562 


239 


851 


Swain 


596 


236 


652 


Graham 


380 


224 


604 


Transylvania 


1,218 


775 


1,995 


Granville 


2,249 


1,348 


3,597 


Tyrrell 


234 


lie 


552 


Greene 


1,083 


591 


1,674 


Union 


3,234 


2,031 


5,265 


Guilford 


24,360 


16,840 


41,200 


Vance 


2,064 


1,176 


5,240 


Halifax 


3,884 


2,164 


6,048 


Wake 


17,054 


12,309 


29,563 


Harnett 


3,334 


2,010 


5,344 


Warren 


1,041 


498 


1,539 


Haywood 


2,458 


1,737 


4,195 


Washington 


856 


473 


1,529 


Henderson 


2,377 


1,538 


3,915 


Watauga 


1,328 


826 


2,154 


Hertford 


1,668 


916 


2,584 


Wayne 


7,222 


5,096 


12,518 


Hoke 


1,192 


693 


1,885 


Wilkes 


2,822 


1,822 


4,644 


Hyde 


292 


141 


433 


Wilson 


4,265 


2,664 


6,929 


Iredell 


4,367 


2,872 


7,239 


Yadkin 


1,425 


960 


2,585 


Jackson 


1,170 


814 


1,984 


Yancey 


727 


466 


1,195 



Sources Department of Rural Sociology, N. C. State College. 



55 



COUNTY" TABLE 5. 



PROJECTED NUIIBER OF NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES IN 
NORTH CAROLINA COUNTIES, 1962-1970 



County 



1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 



1966 



1 969 1970 



Total 


48,014 


48,138 


51,275 


62,127 


61,119 


57,871 


59,318 


61,727 


63,357 


Alamance 


921 


8 09 


951 


1,214 


1,173 


1,089 


1,055 


1,089 


1,239 


Alexander 


150 


155 


187 


254 


235 


225 


229 


243 


215 


Alleghany 


87 


62 


65 


116 


113 


103 


113 


103 


110 


Anson 


303 


335 


317 


380 


376 


361 


353 


355 


380 


Ashe 


282 


232 


269 


343 


297 


280 


272 


329 


285 


Avery 


149 


191 


187 


213 


225 


186 


206 


198 


202 


Beaufort 


463 


423 


463 


530 


517 


483 


475 


519 


480 


Bertie 


232 


261 


333 


327 


363 


333 


346 


368 


361 


Bladen 


401 


369 


377 


491 


467 


463 


447 


466 


479 


Brunswick 


277 


263 


295 


305 


278 


281 


284 


300 


319 


Buncombe 


1,312 


1,256 


1,462 


1,749 


1,653 


1,515 


1,549 


1,577 


1,679 


Burke 


526 


524 


620 


753 


754 


687 


663 


671 


659 


Cabarrus 


778 


759 


813 


1,090 


1,023 


904 


922 


938 


925 


Caldwell 


524 


554 


599 


733 


820 


730 


721 


770 


730 


Camden 


68 


69 


64 


75 


73 


71 


71 


69 


81 


Carteret 


293 


314 


324 


397 


376 


336 


355 


392 


379 


Caswell 


226 


233 


267 


276 


294 


277 


303 


315 


284 


Catawba 


807 


838 


843 


1,072 


1,006 


962 


980 


1,030 


1,009 


Chatham 


325 


326 


350 


379 


376 


383 


367 


388 


367 


Cherokee 


226 


244 


219 


232 


263 


253 


247 


253 


238 


Chowan 


121 


124 


122 


156 


157 


155 


156 


168 


188 


Clay 


70 


75 


82 


90 


91 


75 


87 


69 


35 


Cleveland 


710 


782 


833 


994 


1,017 


919 


918 


914 


966 


Columbus 


692 


625 


709 


814 


807 


761 


730 


803 


786 


Craven 


470 


526 


576 


717 


719 


681 


709 


761 


772 


Cumberland 


1,132 


1,178 


1,262 


1,409 


1,454 


1,441 


1,483 


1,669 


1,726 


Currituck 


81 


81 


64 


88 


84 


62 


71 


79 


83 


Dare 


66 


58 


80 


73 


77 


69 


75 


67 


79 


Davidson 


839 


822 


901 


1,200 


1,146 


1,052 


1,056 


1,137 


1,128 


Davie 


188 


179 


198 


235 


216 


204 


217 


213 


214 


Duplin 


517 


519 


528 


588 


616 


578 


568 


535 


606 


Durham 


1,098 


989 


1,113 


1,354 


1,315 


1,278 


1,299 


1,314 


1,357 


Edgecombe 


461 


462 


449 


555 


581 


549 


577 


616 


625 


Eorsyth 


1,766 


1,703 


1,863 


2,308 


2,242 


2,111 


2,193 


2,336 


2,408 


Franklin 


345 


309 


356 


412 


401 


365 


406 


419 


424 


Gaston 


1,246 


1,265 


1,443 


1,912 


1,894 


1,688 


1,759 


1,799 


1,870 


Gates 


123 


97 


110 


114 


136 


110 


111 


120 


117 


Graham 


31 


77 


97 


101 


96 


103 


92 


103 


89 


Granville 


381 


394 


422 


420 


414 


423 


423 


453 


447 


Greene 


176 


210 


199 


238 


238 


263 


267 


264 


282 


Guilford 


2,192 


2,444 


2,427 


3,109 


3,092 


2,808 


2,965 


3,170 


3,289 


Halifax 


585 


657 


722 


763 


319 


876 


866 


903 


955 


Harnett 


581 


628 


644 


742 


719 


627 


667 


674 


691 


Haywood 


452 


441 


513 


593 


534 


516 


547 


531 


514 


Henderson 


392 


407 


419 


513 


496 


431 


478 


475 


477 


Hertford 


231 


246 


286 


300 


289 


320 


321 


357 


322 


Hoke 


156 


190 


167 


242 


217 


227 


264 


265 


268 


Hyde 


77 


54 


62 


76 


69 


74 


68 


71 


84 


Iredell 


735 


675 


681 


91 8 


867 


781 


822 


851 


879 


Jackson 


183 


205 


208 


263 


257 


203 


212 


206 


202 










(Continued) 











56 
COUNTY TABLE 5. 



projects number of north carolina public high school graduates 
in north Carolina counties, 1962-1970 (continued) 



County 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


1970 


Johnston 


809 


853 


838 


1,013 


1,046 


910 


955 


953 


950 


Jones 


107 


150 


157 


162 


165 


180 


132 


163 


163 


Lee 


31b 


288 


337 


408 


372 


389 


369 


407 


400 


Lenoir 


605 


622 


637 


759 


732 


692 


740 


794 


779 


Lincoln 


306 


317 


342 


442 


429 


380 


403 


401 


438 


McDowell 


320 


338 


335 


450 


408 


395 


394 


383 


394 


Macon 


186 


188 


188 


227 


229 


212 


208 


220 


223 


Madison 


194 


222 


230 


227 


240 


225 


229 


234 


239 


Martin 


360 


337 


367 


396 


394 


406 


394 


433 


422 


Mecklenburg 


2,571 


2,523 


2,593 


3,440 


3,290 


5,176 


3,367 


3,456 


3,721 


Mitchell 


204 


186 


182 


221 


199 


215 


204 


214 


191 


Montgomery 


171 


195 


220 


274 


288 


244 


277 


301 


318 


Moore 


428 


394 


443 


534 


505 


476 


486 


519 


547 


Nash 


882 


814 


878 


1,066 


1,063 


992 


1,065 


1,147 


1,153 


New Hanover 


713 


942 


788 


965 


852 


838 


349 


879 


926 


Northampton 


283 


288 


352 


337 


404 


385 


399 


414 


397 


Onslow 


475 


475 


517 


593 


606 


616 


692 


714 


788 


Orange 


377 


313 


328 


418 


445 


415 


419 


420 


456 


Pamlico 


104 


120 


151 


136 


145 


143 


137 


129 


155 


Pasquotank 


269 


271 


261 


318 


321 


308 


313 


305 


314 


Pender 


249 


280 


258 


271 


279 


256 


259 


271 


249 


Perquimans 


126 


89 


126 


125 


109 


110 


120 


114 


132 


Person 


316 


324 


325 


383 


374 


369 


376 


362 


364 


Pitt 


726 


768 


737 


924 


971 


963 


961 


1,020 


1,069 


Polk 


132 


142 


148 


181 


148 


165 


164 


153 


143 


Randolph 


594 


674 


702 


868 


843 


750 


761 


856 


863 


Richmond 


504 


464 


533 


567 


552 


552 


597 


534 


612 


Robeson 


933 


973 


1,131 


1,416 


1,379 


1,414 


1,495 


1,544 


1,634 


Rockingham 


685 


744 


801 


920 


912 


903 


895 


923 


945 


Rowan 


829 


791 


870 


992 


982 


891 


927 


974 


975 


Rutherford 


508 


490 


558 


620 


644 


628 


632 


637 


627 


Sampson 


703 


673 


629 


706 


694 


624 


695 


696 


728 


Scotland 


276 


294 


304 


405 


399 


411 


450 


460 


497 


Stanly 


463 


458 


489 


624 


561 


535 


538 


554 


548 


Stokes 


218 


244 


234 


324 


311 


278 


288 


315 


302 


Surry 


547 


512 


570 


719 


684 


679 


677 


679 


748 


Swain 


111 


103 


117 


139 


125 


125 


129 


114 


124 


Transylvania 


229 


185 


191 


241 


227 


226 


228 


248 


230 


Tyrrell 


59 


68 


46 


71 


67 


59 


64 


57 


64 


Union 


517 


500 


514 


621 


642 


616 


606 


639 


605 


Vance 


321 


352 


368 


422 


453 


434 


491 


446 


490 


Wake 


1,563 


1,570 


1,656 


1,938 


1,963 


1,932 


1,956 


2,0^5 


2,179 


Warren 


285 


268 


281 


301 


318 


323 


302 


320 


313 


Washington 


181 


141 


175 


184 


205 


I83 


209 


215 


210 


Watauga 


222 


161 


209 


248 


221 


223 


241 


211 


218 


Wayne 


896 


858 


869 


1,109 


1,077 


1,039 


1,018 


1,075 


1,123 


'Wilkes 


459 


456 


597 


693 


688 


646 


616 


642 


658 


Wil son 


660 


638 


652 


800 


840 


728 


735 


813 


829 


Yadkin 


283 


239 


278 


304 


294 


312 


273 


322 


337 


Yancey 


192 


204 


222 


249 


227 


223 


213 


227 


215 



Source: Computations based on 1960-61 enrollment in N. C. public schools and on 
state-wide grade survival ratios by color from pages 39 and ^0 of N. C. 
State RS-41, Projections of Fall Enrollment in N. C. Colleges and 
Universities, I962-I98O. 



COUNTY T:':BL3 6. - Number of High School Graduates and Percent of 

Graduates Entering College. North Carolina, 1961. 



57 





Number 


of High 




Percent 


of Graduates 




School 


Graduates 




Entering College 




County 


White 


Negro 


Total 


White 


Nesro 


Total 


No. Carolina 


33,676 


11,511 


50,187 


39.3 


23.9 


36.9 


Alamance 


319 


179 


998 


43.8 


16.8 


39.0 


Alexander 


160 


22 


182 


23.3 


# 


24.2 


Alleghany 


93 


- 


93 


22.6 


- 


22.6 


Anson 


229 


153 


382 


34.1 


26.1 


30.9 


Ashe 


273 


2 


275 


24.5 


a 


24.4 


Avery 


171 


2 


173 


23.1 


* 


27.7 


Beaufort 


357 


153 


515 


35.0 


23. 4 


31.5 


Bertie 


159 


205 


364 


37.1 


25.9 


30.8 


Bladen 


206 


166 


372 


25.7 


26.5 


26.1 


Brunswick 


157 


131 


288 


18.5 


32.1 


24.7 


Buncombe 


1,233 


129 


1,412 


39.8 


17.8 


37.7 


Burke 


501 


45 


546 


30.7 


46.7 


32.1 


Cabarrus 


761 


105 


866 


41.3 


43.3 


41.6 


Caldwell 


455 


51 


506 


28.4 


25.5 


28.1 


Camden 


37 


22 


59 


54.1 


# 


50.8 


Carteret 


225 


78 


303 


36.9 


33.5 


37.3 


Caswell 


117 


119 


236 


34.2 


20.2 


27.1 


Catawba 


827 


94 


921 


41.2 


35.1 


40.6 


Chatham 


258 


121 


379 


25.6 


19.3 


23.7 


Cherokee 


252 


- 


252 


18.3 


- 


18.3 


Chowan 


88 


49 


137 


42.0 


42.9 


42.3 


Clay 


89 


- 


39 


32.6 


- 


32.6 


Cleveland 


636 


159 


795 


36.5 


29.6 


35.1 


Columbus 


413 


236 


649 


35.6 


23.7 


31.3 


Craven 


326 


119 


445 


42.6 


31.9 


39.3 


Cumberland 


793 


295 


1,088 


41.0 


44.1 


41.8 


Currituck 


52 


26 


78 


61.5 


33.5 


53.8 


Dare 


64 


2 


66 


23. 1 


a 


27.3 


Davidson 


321 


82 


903 


36.1 


25.6 


35.1 


Davie 


136 


12 


148 


30.9 


a 


30.4 


Duplin 


366 


164 


530 


33.9 


22.0 


30.2 


Durham 


714 


295 


1,009 


49.6 


45.8 


43.5 


Edgecombe 


215 


219 


434 


33.1 


21.9 


30.0 


Forsyth 


1,339 


317 


1,706 


41.6 


42.6 


41.8 


Franklin 


232 


131 


363 


37.1 


29.0 


34.2 


Gaston 


1,072 


183 


1,255 


39.0 


35.0 


33.4 


Gates 


63 


51 


114 


44.4 


21.6 


34.2 


Graham 


107 


- 


107 


30.8 


- 


30.8 


Granville 


211 


169 


330 


37.0 


29.0 


33.4 


Greene 


130 


91 


221 


30.0 


7.7 


20.3 


Guilford 


1,877 


380 


2,257 


44.9 


52.9 


46.2 


Halifax 


294 


296 


590 


40.5 


30.7 


35.6 


Harnett 


469 


134 


603 


32.2 


21.6 


29.9 


Haywood 


454 


14 


468 


30.0 


* 


30.1 


Henderson 


423 


36 


459 


35.9 


30.6 


35.5 


Hertford 


131 


139 


270 


52.7 


29.5 


40.7 


Hoke 


82 


73 


160 


41.5 


19.2 


30.6 


Hyde 


32 


37 


69 


28.1 


32.4 


30.4 


Iredell 


604 


129 


733 


42.4 


17.1 


37.9 


Jackson 


172 


4 


176 


32.6 


V: 


31.8 



58 COUNTY TABLE 6. - Number of High School Graduates 2nd Percent of 

(Cont'd.) Graduates Entering College, North Carolina, 1961, 





Number 


of High 




Percent 


of Graduates 




School 
White 


Graduates 
Negro 


Total 


Entering College 




County 


White 


Negro 


Total 


Johnston 


720 


158 


378 


30.7 


25.3 


29.7 


Jones 


77 


63 


145 


31.2 


14.7 


23.4 


Lee 


276 


51 


327 


34.1 


35.3 


34.3 


Lenoir 


394- 


252 


646 


44.7 


20.2 


35.1 


Lincoln 


299 


42 


341 


36.8 


26.2 


35.5 


MsTJowell 


3a 


14 


355 


24.3 


* 


23.2 


Macon 


199 


1 


200 


32.7 


# 


33.0 


Madison 


217 


- 


217 


42.9 


- 


42.9 


Martin 


204. 


157 


361 


43.1 


36.3 


40.2 


FBcklenburg 


2,116 


533 


2,649 


57.0 


34.5 


52.5 


Idtchell 


231 


- 


231 


24.7 


- 


24.7 


i Montgomery 


162 


39 


201 


22.8 


12.8 


20.9 


Moore 


347 


92 


439 


34.3 


22.8 


31.9 


Nash 


530 


302 


832 


45.3 


31.5 


40.3 


New Hanover 


583 


175 


758 


51.1 


38.3 


48.2 


Northampton 


157 


L46 


303 


42.0 


25.3 


34.0 


Onslow 


318 


62 


380 


33.0 


33.9 


37.4 


Orange 


256 


102 


358 


50.8 


19.6 


41.9 


Pamlico 


71 


49 


120 


29.6 


14.3 


23.3 


Pasquotank 


199 


101 


300 


57.3 


40.6 


51.7 


Pender 


H9 


107 


256 


30.2 


14.0 


23.4 


Perquimans 


63 


56 


119 


33.1 


19.6 


29.4 


Person 


227 


121 


348 


31.3 


19.0 


27.0 


Pitt 


451 


300 


751 


53.2 


23.0 


43.1 


Polk 


U5 


5 


150 


31.0 


% 


31.3 


Randolph 


640 


72 


712 


36.2 


26.4 


35.3 


Richmond 


372 


95 


467 


33.4 


21.1 


34.9 


Robeson 


645 


300 


945 


41.9 


25.3 


36.6 


Rockingham 


593 


181 


779 


23.6 


30.4 


29.0 


Rowan 


770 


180 


950 


41.0 


33.9 


39.7 


Rutherford 


482 


70 


552 


47.9 


34.3 


46.2 


Sampson 


507 


251 


758 


33.1 


24.3 


30.2 


Scotland 


169 


126 


295 


36.7 


23. C 


30.8 


Stanly 


489 


49 


538 


36.8 


26.5 


35.9 


Stokes 


240 


23 


263 


17.5 


4f 


16.7 


Surry 


577 


29 


606 


33.6 


27.6 


33.3 


Swain 


109 


- 


109 


34.9 


- 


34.9 


Transylvania 


212 


- 


212 


34.4 


- 


34.4 


Tyrrell 


26 


32 


58 


30.8 


15.6 


22.4 


Union 


428 


91 


519 


27.8 


23.1 


27.0 


Vance 


230 


117 


347 


38.3 


20.5 


32.3 


Wake 


1,182 


439 


1,621 


56.3 


36.4 


50.9 


Warren 


127 


16S 


295 


44.9 


16.7 


23.8 


Washington 


92 


77 


169 


34.8 


23.4 


29.6 


Watauga 


213 


1 


219 


37.2 


a 


37.4 


Wayne 


580 


323 


903 


3S.6 


18.9 


31.6 


Willies 


523 


51 


574 


30.4 


23.5 


29.8 


Wilson 


UU1 


261 


708 


45.6 


19.9 


36.2 


Yadkin 


292 


13 


305 


23.6 


# 


23.6 


Yancey 


194 


- 


194 


25.3 


- 


25.8 



Source; N.C.Lept. of Fublic Instruction, 
of High School Graduates. 



1961 Follow-up Survey 



59 



COUNTY TABLE 7- 



ENROLLMFINT OF NORTE CAROLINA COLLEGE STUDENTS 3Y 
COUNTY LOCATION OF COLLEGE ATTENDED, I96O-6I. 



County 



Enrollment Within the County Perceiit List. of County Enroll . 
From From 

Within From From Within From From 

The Adj. Other The Adj. Other 

To tal Co'iinty Counties Counties To tal County Counties Counties 



North Carolina. 


43,298 


9,695 


6,803 


26,600 


100.0 


22.9 


15.7 


61.4 


Alamance 


530 


246 


141 


143 


100.0 


4£.4 


26.6 


27.0 


Avery 


183 


30 


23 


135 


100.0 


16.0 


12.2 


71.3 


Buncombe 


351 


232 


45 


74 


100.0 


66.1 


12.8 


21.1 


Cabarrus 


149 


56 


34 


59 


100.0 


37.6 


22.8 


39.6 


Cata'Wba 


873 


336 


247 


295 


100.0 


38.3 


28.1 


33-6 


Cleveland 


522 


131 


179 


162 


100.0 


34.7 


34.3 


31.0 


Cumberland 


917 


313 


131 


473 


100.0 


34.1 


14.3 


51.6 


Durham 


2.703 


361 


255 


1,837 


100.0 


20. 8 


9.4 


69.8 


Forsyth 


2,490 


662 


324 


1,504 


100.0 


26.6 


13.0 


60.4 


Franklin 


366 


71 


90 


205 


100.0 


19.4 


24.6 


56.O 


Gaston 


325 


210 


65 


53 


100.0 


64.0 


19.8 


16.2 


Guilford 


5,466 


1,307 


928 


3,231 


100.0 


23.9 


17.0 


59-1 


Harnett 


917 


173 


311 


433 


100.0 


13.9 


33.9 


47-2 


Hertford 


236 


39 


56 


191 


100.0 


13.6 


19.6 


66.8 


Iredell 


243 


140 


60 


43 


100.0 


57.6 


24.7 


17.7 


Jackson 


1,437 


164 


264 


1,059 


100.0 


11.0 


17.8 


71.2 


Madison 


713 


64 


143 


506 


100. 


9.0 


20.1 


71.0 


Mecklenburg 


1,896 


1,158 


195 


5^3 


100.0 


61.1 


10.3 


28.6 


Hash 


82 


38 


30 


14 


100.0 


46.3 


36.6 


17.1 


Hew Hanover 


614 


411 


68 


135 


100.0 


66.9 


11.1 


22.0 


Orange 


4,429 


207 


366 


3,836 


100.0 


4.7 


3.7 


86.6 


Pas quo tank 


594 


74 


47 


473 


100.0 


12.5 


7-9 


79.6 


Pitt 


3,856 


439 


694 


2,723 


100.0 


11.4 


18.0 


70.6 


Robeson 


546 


314 


103 


129 


100.0 


57.5 


18.9 


23.6 


Hov:en 


981 


351 


232 


396 


1C0.0 


35.8 


23.6 


40.6 


Sampson 


50 


23 


7 


20 


100.0 


46.0 


14.0 


40.0 


Stanly 


631 


119 


176 


336 


100.0 


18.9 


27-9 


53-2 


Trans ylvania 


269 


40 


65 


164 


100.0 


14.9 


24.2 


61.0 


Union 


546 


84 


220 


242 


100.0 


15.4 


40.3 


44.3 


Wake 


7,080 


1,378 


593 


5,109 


100.0 


19.5 


8.4 


72.2 


Watauga 


2,063 


144 


309 


1,610 


100.0 


7.0 


15.0 


73.0 


Wayne 


100 


35 


37 


23 


100.0 


35.0 


37.0 


26.0 


Wilson 


1,027 


295 


345 


387 


100.0 


28.7 


33-6 


37.7 



Source: Survey, the Worth Carolina 3oard of Higher Education, 
by James E. HilLman 



60 



COUNTY TABLE 8. 



ENROLLMENT OP WORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE STUDENTS 
BY COUNTY LOCATION OF Efc-E RESIDENCE, I96O-6I. 



Er.ro llment From the County Percent List. of Coll. Enroll. 







In 


In 


In 




In 


In 


In 






The 


Adj. 


Other 




The 


Adj. 


Other 


County 


Total 


County 


Counties 


Counties Total 


County 


Counties 


Counties 


North Carolina 


43, 298 


9,395 


6,803 


26,600 


100.0 


22.9 


15.7 


61.4 


Alamance 


838 


246 


221 


371 


100.0 


29.4 


26.4 


44.3 


Alexander 


119 


— 


38 


81 


100.0 


— 


31.9 


68.1 


Alleghany 


48 


— 




48 


100.0 


— 


- 


100.0 


Anson 


213 


— 


52 


161 


1C0.0 


- 


24.4 


75.6 


Ashe 


127 


— 


70 


57 


100.0 


— 


55-1 


44.9 


Avery 


110 


30 


48 


32 


100.0 


27.3 


43.6 


29.1 


Beaufort 


364 


— 


135 


229 


100.0 


— 


37-1 


62.9 


Bertie 


223 


— 


16 


207 


100.0 


- 


7.2 


92.3 


Bladen 


222 


— 


33 


I89 


100.0 


— 


14.9 


85.1 


Brunswick 


137 


— 


35 


102 


100.0 


— 


25.5 


74.5 


Buncombe 


1,170 


232 


128 


810 


100.0 


19.8 


10.9 


69.2 


Burke 


509 


— 


78 


431 


100.0 


- 


15.3 


84.7 


Cabarrus 


772 


56 


259 


457 


100.0 


7.3 


33.5 


59.2 


Caldwell 


394 


— 


174 


220 


100.0 


— 


44.2 


55.8 


Camden 


52 


— 


12 


40 


100.0 


— 


23.I 


76.9 


Carteret 


259 


- 


— 


259 


100.0 


— 


— 


100.0 


Caswell 


104 


— 


34 


70 


100.0 


— 


32.7 


67.3 


Ca tawba 


811 


336 


19 


456 


100.0 


41.4 


2.3 


56.2 


Chatham 


215 


— 


114 


101 


100.0 


— 


53.0 


47.0 


Cherokee 


86 


— 


— 


86 


100.0 


— 


_ 


100.0 


Chowan 


106 


— 


4 


102 


1C0.0 


— 


3.8 


96.2 


Clay 


30 


- 


- 


30 


100.0 


- 


- 


100.0 


Cleveland 


656 


181 


26 


449 


100.0 


27.6 


4.0 


68.4 


Columbus 


449 


— 


25 


424 


100.0 


— 


5-6 


94.4 


Craven 


403 


- 


100 


303 


100.0 


— 


24.8 


75.2 


Cumberland 


1,000 


313 


85 


602 


100.0 


31.3 


8.5 


60.2 


Currituck 


48 


— 


_ 


43 


100.0 


— 


_ 


100.0 


Dare 


48 


— 


— 


48 


100.0 


— 


— 


100.0 


Davidson 


653 


- 


301 


352 


100.0 


- 


46.1 


53.9 


Davie 


102 


- 


23 


79 


100.0 


— 


22.5 


77.5 


Duplin 


378 


— 


15 


363 


100.0 


— 


4.0 


96.0 


Durham 


1,318 


561 


368 


339 


100.0 


42.6 


27.9 


29.5 


Edgecombe 


534 


— 


186 


348 


100.0 


— 


34.8 


65.2 


Forsyth 


1,927 


662 


320 


945 


100.0 


34.4 


16.6 


49.* 


Franklin 


272 


71 


53 


148 


100.0 


26.1 


19.5 


54.4 


Gaston 


1,102 


210 


141 


751 


100.0 


19.1 


12.8 


68.1 


Gates 


82 


— 


21 


61 


100.0 


— 


25.6 


74.4 


Graham 


43 


— 


— 


43 


100.0 


— 


— 


100.0 


Granville 


265 


— 


104 


lol 


100.0 


— 


?9.2 


60.8 


Greene 


149 


— 


56 


93 


100.0 


— 


37.6 


62.4 


Guilford 


2,531 


1,307 


179 


1,095 


100.0 


48.8 


6.9 


44.3 


Halifax 


491 


— 


22 


469 


100.0 


— 


4.5 


95.5 


Harnett 


508 


173 


92 


243 


100.0 


34.1 


18.1 


47.8 


Haywood 


337 


- 


187 


150 


100.0 


- 


55-5 


44.5 


Henderson 


272 


- 


24 


248 


100.0 


- 


8.8 


91.2 


Hertford 


252 


39 


- 


213 


10C.0 


15.5 


— 


84.5 


Hoke 


78 


- 


24 


54 


100.0 


— 


30.8 


69.2 


Hyde 


40 


— 


- 


40 


100.0 


— 


— 


100.0 


Iredell 


692 


140 


124 


428 


100.0 


20.2 


17.9 


61.8 


Jackson 


203 


164 


- 


39 


100.0 


80.8 


- 


19.2 



fl 



C0L1ITY TABLE 8. 


EURQLLM 


EHT OP 


NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE STUDENTS 






(continued) 


BY COUNTY LOCi. 


.HOI 01 HOME RESIDENCE, 


1960-61 


• 






Enrollment Prom the County 


Percent Dist. 
In 


of Coll. 
In 


Enroll. 






In 


In 


In 


In 






The 


Adj. 


Other 




The 


Ad.j. 


Other 


County 


Total 


County 


Counties 


Counties 


; Total 


County 


Counties 


Counties 


Johns ton 


629 





279 


350 


100.0 


_» 


44.4 


55.6 


Jones 


93 


- 


— 


93 


100.0 


— 


— 


100.0 


Lee 


273 


- 


25 


253 


10C.0 


— 


9.0 


91.0 


Lenoir 


548 


- 


143 


405 


100.0 


- 


26.1 


73.9 


Lincoln 


199 


- 


56 


143 


100.0 


— 


28.1 


71.9 


McDowell 


223 


— 


19 


204 


100.0 


- 


8.5 


91.5 


Macon 


126 


— 


67 


59 


100.0 


— 


53-2 


46.8 


Madison 


141 


64 


8 


69 


100.0 


45.4 


5.7 


48.9 


Martin 


353 


— 


112 


246 


100.0 


— 


31.3 


68.7 


Mecklenburg 


3,028 


1,158 


163 


1,702 


100.0 


38.2 


5.5 


56.2 


Mitchell 


87 


— 


4 


83 


100.0 


— 


4.6 


95.4 


Montgomery 


164 


— 


21 


143 


100.0 


— 


12.8 


87.2 


Moore 


346 


— 


22 


324 


100.0 


— 


6.4 


93-6 


Hash 


536 


38 


160 


338 


100.0 


7.1 


29.9 


63.I 


Hew Hanover 


669 


411 


— 


458 


100.0 


47.3 


- 


52.7 


Northampton 


239 


- 


24 


215 


100.0 


- 


10.0 


90.0 


Onslow 


270 


— 


— 


270 


100.0 


— 


- 


100.0 


Orange 


409 


207 


61 


141 


100.0 


50.6 


14.9 


34.5 


Pamlico 


67 


— 


— 


67 


100.0 


- 


— 


100.0 


Pasquotank 


249 


74 


— 


175 


100.0 


29.7 


- 


70.3 


Pender 


186 


— 


33 


153 


100.0 


— 


17.7 


82.3 


Perquimans 


105 


— 


26 


79 


100.0 


— 


24.8 


75.2 


Person 


233 


_ 


44 


I89 


100.0 


— 


13.9 


81.1 


Pitt 


818 


439 


13 


361 


100.0 


53.7 


2.2 


44.1 


Polk 


34 


— 


— 


64 


100.0 


— 


— 


100.0 


Eandclph 


493 


— 


176 


317 


100.0 


— 


35.7 


64.3 


Richmond 


342 


— 


10 


332 


10C.0 


— 


2-9 


97.1 


Rooeson 


854 


314 


49 


491 


100.0 


36.8 


5.7 


57.5 


Rockingham 


506 


— 


206 


298 


100.0 


— 


41.1 


53.9 


Rov/an 


1,004 


351 


64 


589 


100.0 


35.0 


6.4 


58.7 


Rutherford 


421 


— 


30 


341 


10c. 


— 


19.0 


81.0 


Sampson 


491 


23 


74 


394 


100.0 


4.7 


15.1 


80.2 


Scotland 


212 


— 


31 


181 


100.0 


— 


14.6 


85.4 


Stanly- 


437 


119 


53 


315 


100.0 


24.4 


10.9 


64.7 


Stokes 


106 


— 


50 


56 


100.0 


— 


47.2 


52.8 


Surry 


412 


— 


46 


366 


100.0 


— 


11.2 


83.8 


Swain 


37 


- 


51 


36 


100.0 


- 


58.6 


41.4 


Transylvania 


123 


40 


16 


67 


100.0 


32.5 


13.0 


54.5 


Tyrrell 


35 


- 


— 


35 


100.0 


- 


— 


100.0 


Union 


362 


64 


3o 


242 


100.0 


23.2 


9-9 


65.9 


Vance 


304 


- 


23 


281 


100.0 


— 


7.6 


92.4 


T .:ake 


2,513 


1.378 


245 


390 


1C0.0 


54.8 


9.7 


35-4 


l.'arren 


164 


- 


5 


159 


100.0 


- 


3.0 


97.0 


hashing ton 


123 


— 


— 


123 


100.0 


- 


- 


100.0 


Watauga 


193 


144 


3 


h6 


100.0 


74.6 


1.6 


23.8 


Uayne 


750 


35 


104 


611 


100.0 


4.7 


13.9 


81.5 


Uilkes 


303 


- 


115 


188 


100.0 


- 


36.0 


62.0 


'..'ilson 


707 


295 


39 


323 


100.0 


41.7 


12.6 


45.7 


Yadkin 


138 


- 


18 


120 


100.0 


- 


13.0 


37.0 


Yancey 


91 


- 


21 


70 


100.0 


- 


23.I 


76.9 


Source: Survey, 


the llort] 


1 Carol 


ina Board 


of Higher Education, 


by J.E.Hillman. 



62 



COUNTY TABLE 9. INCOME DATA RELATING TO THE STATE-COUNTY SHARING OF COSTS 
OF PUBLIC SERVICES, ILLUSTRATING A 50-50 SLIDING-SCALE FORMULA 



STATE 
AND 
COUNTIES 



Per 


Per Capita 




County 


Cap i ta 


Personal 


Median 


Percent 


Personal 


State 


Family 


of 


Income 


Income Tax 


Income 


Shared 


1958 


1959 


1959 


Cost* 


$1 ,420 


15.46 


$3,956 


51.4 


1,667 


21.43 


5,379 


69.3 


905 


6.97 


3,814 


25.9 


86^ 


4.79 


2,910 


20.0* 


967 


7.62 


2,763 


27.9 


911 


4.67 


2,296 


20.0* 


536 


4.38 


2,569 


20.0* 


1,143 


8.10 


2,409 


29.3 


956 


6.02 


2,117 


23.1 


909 


4.37 


2,446 


20.0* 


706 


4.75 


2,678 


20.0* 


1,541 


20.03 


4,419 


65.1 


1,272 


12.98 


4,303 


43.9 


1,634 


17.27 


4,906 


56.8 


1,325 


12.44 


4,054 


42.3 


825 


7.13 


2,792 


26.5 


1,106 


9.91 


4,053 


34.7 


762 


3.96 


2,806 


20.0* 


1,664 


20.85 


4,781 


67.6 


1,281 


10.11 


3,611 


35.3 


918 


5.04 


2,396 


20.1 


1,272 


7.81 


2,714 


28.4 


671 


2.85 


1,921 


20.0* 


1,192 


12.30 


3,901 


41.9 


1,209 


6.92 


2,572 


25.8 


1,431 


9.66 


3,708 


34.0 


1,669 


7.99 


3,809 


29.0 


1,136 


9.67 


3,485 


34.0 


789 


8.94 


3,226 


31.8 


1,371 


16.35 


4,623 


54.1 


1,189 


12.85 


4,204 


43.6 


1,095 


5.26 


2,151 


20.8 


1,699 


23.55 


4,376 


75.7 


1,186 


9.47 


2,935 


33.4 


2,076 


23.11 


5,549 


80.0* 


891 


5.86 


2,366 


22.6 


1,601 


16.45 


4,694 


54.4 


904 


5.44 


2,260 


21.3 


864 


7.45 


2,525 


27.4 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Alamance 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Avery 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 



63 



COUNTY TABLE 9. INCOME DATA RELATING TO TIE STATE-COUNTY SHARING OF COSTS 

OF PUBLIC SERVICES, ILLUSTRATING A 50-50 3LIDING-SCALE FORMULA. 

(Continued) 



STATE 

Am 

COUNTIES 



per 

Cap i ta 

Personal 

Income 

1958 



Per Capita 
Personal 

State 

Income Tax 

1959 



Median 

Family 

Income 

1959 



County- 
Percent 

of 
Shared 
Cost* 



Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Hertford 

Hoke 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jone3 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 



$1,038 
1,116 
1,961 
1,095 
1,106 
1,380 
1,366 
1,070 
1,027 

566 
1,501 

741 
1,058 

910 
1,337 
1,437 
1,094 
1,133 

921 

718 
1,230 
2,242 

928 
1,251 
1,220 
1,240 
1,881 

39C 
1,671 
1,102 

717 
1,311 

753 
1,042 
1,101 
1,327 
1,197 
1,370 
1,227 



8.17 
4,59 

29.48 
9.03 
6.41 

18.26 

16.17 
8.39 
5.48 
2.72 

14.99 
6.55 
6.91 
4.16 

15.19 

12.94 
9.51 

11.08 
5.79 
3.8A 
6.52 

32.44 

8.11 

9.16 

13.11 

11.49 

24.10 

4-91 

4.64 

17.54 

5.60 

12.92 

3.96 

5.65 

8.45 

10.54 

22.19 

14.50 

11.63 



$2,932 
1,451 
5,417 
2,797 
2,972 
4,701 
3,984 
2,714 
2,733 
1,979 
4,300 

2,994 

2,469 

2,238 

4,097 

3,243 

3,847 

3,786 

2,608 

2,007 

2,366 

5,632 

2,779 

3,365 

3,550 

3,119 

4,336 

2,255 

3,729 

4,271 

2,851 

3,630 

2,376 

2,370 

3,231 

2,675 

3,524 

4,593 

3,774 



29.5 

20.0* 

80.0* 

32.1 

24.2 

59.8 

53.5 

30.2 

21.4 

20.0* 

50.0 

24.7 

25.7 

20.0* 

50.6 

43.8 

33.5 

38.2 

22.4 

20.0* 

24.6 

80.0* 

29.3 

32.5 

44.3 

39.5 

77.3 

20.0* 

20.0* 

57.6 

21.8 

43.8 

20.0* 

22.0 

30.4 

36.6 

71.6 

48.5 

39.9 



64 



COUNTY TABIE 9. INCOME DATA RELATING TO THE STATE-COUNTY SHARING OF COSTS 

OF PUBLIC SERVICES, ILLUSTRATING A 50-50 SL3DING-SCALE FORMULA 

(Continued) 



STATE 
AND 
COUNTIES 



Per 


Per Capita 




County- 


Cap i ta 


Personal 


Median 


Percent 


Personal 


State 


Family 


of 


Income 


Income Tax 


Income 


Shared 


1953 


1959 


1959 


Cost* 


$898 


6.30 


$2,247 


23.9 


1,447 


16.03 


4,338 


53.1 


1,365 


17.96 


4,659 


58.9 


1,194- 


10.41 


3,751 


36.2 


980 


5.43 


2,283 


21.4 


1,215 


3.20 


2,919 


29.6 


1,331 


13.98 


4,237 


46.9 


867 


6.55 


3,240 


24.7 


1,652 


14.38 


3,717 


48.1 


903 


6.01 


2,484 


23.0 


1,497 


13.69 


4,172 


46.1 


686 


4.23 


1,927 


20.0* 


1,012 


10.10 


3,837 


35.3 


1,203 


10.29 


3,046 


35.9 


1,698 


23.48 


4,380 


75.4 


798 


5.59 


1,958 


21.3 


1,047 


9.42 


3,495 


33.3 


743 


7.05 


2,497 


26.2 


1,339 


8.92 


3,022 


31.8 


899 


9.26 


3,126 


32.8 


1,273 


11.45 


3,087 


39.4 


913 


10.26 


3,760 


35.3 


712 


4.43 


2,445 


20.0* 



Robeson 
Rockingham 
Rowan 
Rutherford 
Sampson 
Scotland 
Stanly- 
Stokes 
Surry 
Sx^ain 

Transylvania 
Tyrrell 
Union 
Vance 
Wake 
Warren 
Washington 
Watauga 
Wayne 
Wilkes 
Wilson 
Yadkin 
Yancey 



* Formula: County % = 20.0 % + 3% (Per capita income tax) - 5.00. Under 
this formula in no case is a county expected to pay less than 20.0 percent 
nor more than 80. percent of the shared cost. 



COUUTY TABLE 10. 



YEARS OF SCHOOL COMPLETED 3Y PERSONS 25 OH MORE 
YEARS OF AGE, BY COUUTY, KORTK CAOLI1TA, i960. 



65 



Cumulative Percentage 





^dult 


Under 


H.S.Grad. 


Some 


College 


Some Coll. 


Coll. Grad. 




Popu- 


3 


Or 


College 


Grad. 


- 


- 


County 


lation 
2,307,171 


Grades 
41.5 


Mo re 


Or More 
13.4 


Or More 
6.3 


H.S. Grad. 
41.5 


Some Coil. 


Ef. Carolina 


32.3 


47.0 


Alamance 


45,778 


37.4 


35-3 


14.5 


6.6 


41.0 


45.9 


Alexander 


8,037 


53-2 


21.1 


7.3 


4.2 


34.4 


58.0 


Alleghany- 


4,322 


53-3 


22.4 


7.1 


3-2 


31.8 


44.5 


Anson 


12,073 


46.6 


27.1 


9.4 


4.2 


34.7 


44.3 


Ashe 


10,451 


56.I 


20.6 


6.0 


2.7 


29.2 


44.7 


Avery- 


6,059 


47.5 


23.9 


9.6 


4.0 


40.2 


41.2 


Beaufort 


18,508 


49.5 


25.8 


9.4 


3-9 


36.2 


42.1 


Bertie 


11,344 


54.1 


21.8 


9.5 


3-6 


43.5 


38.I 


3 laden 


13,091 


50.4 


21.2 


6.4 


3-1 


30.2 


48.3 


Brunswick 


9,873 


55.4 


20.3 


5-3 


2.3 


25.7 


42.4 


Buncombe 


75.090 


31.4 


40.5 


17.5 


7.6 


43.2 


43.4 


3urke 


28,576 


47-3 


25.7 


9.7 


4.3 


37-6 


44.9 


Cpbarrus 


37,218 


44.0 


27.8 


10.2 


4.1 


36.8 


40.6 


Caldwell 


24, 374 


48.6 


25.2 


9.8 


4.5 


39.0 


45.6 


Camden 


2,831 


51.9 


23.6 


8.2 


2.6 


34.7 


31-5 


Carteret 


15,718 


34.6 


36.7 


13.1 


5.4 


35.6 


41.6 


Caswell 


9,131 


56.7 


21.7 


7.2 


3-0 


33.2 


41.0 


Catawba 


37,871 


36.7 


34.3 


14.5 


6.6 


42.2 


45.3 


Chatham 


13,986 


43.5 


26.6 


9-0 


3-9 


33-7 


43.6 


Cherokee 


8,595 


53-7 


22.0 


8.7 


3.5 


39.3 


39-9 


Chowan 


5.841 


50.0 


26.3 


10.3 


5.1 


39-3 


49.6 


Clay 


2,944 


53.3 


21.2 


7.8 


4.4 


36.8 


57.2 


Cleveland 


33.757 


44.7 


29.8 


11.2 


4.9 


37-6 


43.9 


Columbus 


22,395 


45-9 


23.9 


8.9 


4.1 


37.2 


46.5 


Craven 


26,906 


35.8 


36.7 


12.5 


5.1 


34.2 


40.7 


Cumberland 


60,763 


28.6 


42.3 


15-9 


6.3 


37.2 


42.9 


Currituck 


3,680 


45.4 


24.9 


9.6 


1.6 


38.7 


37.2 


Dare 


3.451 


39-2 


28.4 


10.8 


4.3 


38.I 


39.4 


Davi ds on 


41,524 


44.2 


28.3 


9.5 


4.3 


33.7 


44.9 


Davie 


9,119 


46.6 


24.9 


7.5 


3.4 


29.9 


45.6 


Duplin 


19.559 


2jS.o 


24.4 


8.1 


3.4 


33-3 


41.5 


Durham 


59.5C6 


36.0 


37.3 


13.3 


10.3 


49.0 


59.1 


Edgecombe 


25.479 


51.7 


26.5 


10 . 4 


4.7 


39-1 


45.5 


Forsyth 


101,091 


33.4 


39.8 


16.9 


9-0 


42.5 


53-1 


Franklin 


14, 166 


52.8 


25.4 


9.4 


4.2 


37.1 


44.8 


C-as ton 


65,937 


47.5 


25.1 


10.1 


4.5 


40.4 


44.2 


Gates 


4.735 


52.5 


26.3 


9.5 


4.5 


36.2 


47.O 


Graham 


3.139 


63.2 


16.2 


4.7 


2.1 


29.1 


45.3 


Granville 


16,996 


49.9 


26.1 


10.4 


4.5 


39.9 


43.I 


Greene 


7,212 


53.9 


21.6 


7.4 


3-7 


34.1 


50.5 


Guilford 


130,031 


32.5 


40.2 


19.6 


9-3 


48.9 


47.4 


Ealifax 


27,673 


55.7 


22.2 


3.7 


4.2 


39-3 


47.6 


Earne tt 


23,640 


48.7 


24.4 


3.4 


3-5 


34.4 


41.9 


Haywood 


21,460 


40.9 


32.4 


11.9 


5.3 


36.8 


44.2 


Henderson 


20,624 


35.6 


37.0 


14.8 


6.8 


40.1 


46.0 


Hertford 


10,751 


49.6 


27.4 


12.6 


5-8 


45.9 


45.8 


Hoke 


6,992 


52.5 


24.2 


10.4 


4.4 


42.9 


42.3 


Hyde 


3,074 


^2.0 


23.3 


3.1 


4.0 


34.7 


49-4 


Iredell 


33,635 


41.2 


31-5 


11.1 


4.4 


35.2 


40.0 


Jackson 


9,026 


49.2 


27.I 


11.8 


6.4 


43.4 


53-9 



66 



COUNTY TABLE 


10. YEARS 


OP SCHO 


3L CO.-IPLET 


ED BY FE] 


1S0HS 25 ( 


)R MORE 




( con tinned) 


YEARS 


OP AGE, 


BY COUHTY 


, ITORTE ( 


3AR0LBTA, 


I960. 






Adult 




Cumulative Percentage 








Under 


E.S.Grad. 


Some 


College 


Some Coll. 


Coll. Grad 




Popu- 


8 


Or 


College 


Grad. 


•f 


t 


County 


lation 
31,706 


Grades 
54.6 


Mo re 


Or More 
3.4 


Or More 

3-4 


K.S. Grad. 
38.I 


Some Coll 


Johns ton 


22.1 


40.8 


Jones 


5,035 


47.8 


23.I 


7-2 


3-4 


31 .2 


46.7 


Lee 


13,399 


36.O 


36.4 


14.7 


6.5 


40.3 


44.6 


Leno i r 


26,328 


^5-4 


30.0 


12.1 


6.2 


40.4 


51-3 


Lincoln 


14,990 


46.5 


26.1 


8.4 


3.7 


32.3 


43.7 


McDowell 


14, 075 


43.8 


24.0 


7.8 


3.3 


32.3 


42.7 


Macon 


8,063 


53.0 


20.8 


3.6 


4.6 


41.6 


53-5 


Madison 


8,788 


55.0 


20.6 


3.5 


4.3 


41.1 


51.2 


Martin 


12,53^ 


52.2 


25.0 


10.0 


4.7 


40.1 


46.6 


Mecklenburg 


143,630 


25.3 


47.8 


23.2 


10.7 


48.5 


46.3 


Mitchell 


7,383 


51.3 


21.6 


7.9 


3.0 


36.5 


37-7 


Montgomery 


9,387 


46.9 


25.7 


3 


3-7 


34.7 


41.3 


Moore 


13,953 


39-3 


33-5 


12.0 


5-6 


35-8 


46.6 


Hash 


29,531 


50.3 


26.9 


11.0 


5.0 


40.7 


45.9 


Hew Hanover 


38,804 


31.9 


38.O 


15.4 


6.5 


40.4 


42.0 


Northampton 


12,479 


58.9 


21.7 


8.8 


4.7 


40.3 


53-4 


Ons low 


28,742 


22.8 


46.7 


14.6 


6.9 


31.3 


47-3 


Orange 


19, 884 


33-8 


46.2 


31.4 


22.7 


67.8 


72.4 


Pamlico 


4,859 


43.9 


25.7 


8.4 


3.3 ■ 


32.8 


39-3 


Pasquotank 


13,038 


42.4 


31.7 


12.1 


5.1 


38.0 


42.5 


Pender 


3,974 


45.8 


23.7 


7.2 


3.2 


30.6 


43.5 


Perquimans 


4,777 


50.0 


25.I 


8.5 


3-8 


33-3 


45.1 


Person 


12.982 


48.6 


25.O 


8.2 


3-9 


32. 3 


47.3 


Pitt 


32,410 


47.7 


29.2 


14.3 


6.9 


49.0 


48.1 


Polk 


6,364 


40.7 


32.5 


15.0 


7.3 


46.2 


43.6 


Randolph 


32,994 


43.4 


27.1 


8.2 


3.7 


30.2 


45.8 


Richmond 


20,011 


46.0 


26.1 


9.4 


4.4 


36.2 


47.1 


Robeson 


38,206 


51-5 


24.3 


11.1 


5-2 


45.6 


46.9 


Rockingham 


37,336 


49.8 


24.0 


8.7 


3-9 


36.2 


45.I 


Rowan 


46,432 


37.8 


33-1 


11.4 


4.9 


34.6 


43.0 


Rutherford 


24, 481 


46.0 


26.9 


8.7 


3.6 


-32.4 


41.4 


Sampson 


23, 440 


43.7 


23.9 


9.2 


4.1 


38.6 


44.3 


Scotland 


11,547 


53-6 


23.2 


10.3 


5.0 


44.5 


48.3 


S tanly 


22,166 


41.9 


29.0 


9.6 


4.3 


33.2 


44.5 


Stokes 


11,665 


53-6 


20.3 


4.6 


2.1 


22.6 


'46.3 


Surry 


25,705 


49-9 


25.6 


8.6 


4.2 


33-7 


48.6 


Swain 


4,268 


49.6 


20.6 


8.8 


4.6 


42.7 


52.0 


Transylvania 


8,242 


37-7 


36.6 


15.O 


7-3 


41.0 


48.8 


Tyrrell 


2,310 


51.6 


21.0 


8.4 


4.0 


39-7 


47.7 


Union 


22,138 


41.9 


23.9 


9-7 


4.5 


33-5 


46.9 


Vance 


16, 127 


49.4 


25.6 


11.1 


4.6 


43.3 


41.4 


Wake 


88,690 


30.5 


46.8 


25.3 


12.7 


54.0 


50.3 


Warren 


9,229 


53.8 


25.I 


9-8 


4.5 


39.2 


45.3 


Washington 


6,393 


48.0 


24.0 


7-9 


3.9 


32.9 


49.6 


Watauga 


8,633 


45.5 


30.6 


14.0 


7.3 


45.8 


52.4 


Wayne 


40,216 


39-1 


33.5 


12.5 


5.4 


37-3 


43.I 


Wilkes 


22,388 


56.0 


21.6 


7.2 


3-6 


33.0 


50.6 


Wilson 


28, 334 


48.9 


26.3 


11.8 


5-3 


44.8 


44.7 


Yadkin 


12,281 


51-5 


23.2 


6.5 


2.3 


28.0 


42.9 


Yancey 


7,290 


53.6 


21.7 


7.4 


2.9 


33-9 


39.0 


Source: U.S. 


Census of population, i960. 


Horth Carolina, G 


General Social 


and 1 


Iconomic Characteristics, FC(l) 35C, Tables 47 


and 83. 





67 



SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 



1. Community Colleges — Special Bulletin . (Raleigh: II. C. Board of Higher 

Education, i960.) '40 pages. 

2. Community College Study . (Raleigh: State Superintendent of Public 

Instruction, 1952.) (Publication llo. 285.) kk pages. 

3. The Community Junior College in Florida's future . (Tallahassee: State 

Department of Education, 19570 71 pages. 

k. Conference Proceedings — State Directors of Junior Colleges and 

Coordinators of State Systems of 2-Year Colleges . (October 18-19, 
I961, Chicago.) ('.Washington: Government Printing Office, 1962.) 
53 pages. 

5- Establishing Legal Bases for Community Col l eges . (Proceedings of a 
Conference sponsored by the Commission on Legislation of the 
American Association of Junior Colleges, October 20-21, 196l, 
Chicago.) ("ashington: The Association, 1962.) ^3 pages. 

o. Projections of Eall Enrollment in Hcrth Carolina Colleges and 
Universities 1962-1980 . (Raleigh: Progress Report Rs-4l, 
prepared by C. Horace Hamilton, Department of Rural Sociology, 
ITorth Carolina State College, February I962.) 60 pages. 

7- Henry, HelsonB., (editor), The Public Junior College . (55th Yearbook 
of the national Society for the Study of Education, Part I.) 
(Chicago: The Society, 1956.) 3^7 pages. 

8. Eillman, James E., Some Basic Research Data for Determining the Place 
of the Community College in ITorth Carolina's System of Higher 
Education . (Raleigh: fl.C. Board of Higher Education, I96I.) 
(Mimeographed.) ok pages. 

9- Keller, Robert J., et al. , The Junior College in Minnesota . (St. Paul: 
State Department of Education, 1953.) l6k pages. 

10. Martorana, S.V., The Community College in Michigan . (Staff Study llo.l, 

The Survey of Higher Education in Michigan.) (Lansing, revised 
edition June 1957.) (Mimeographed.) 210 pages. 

11. , "Consideration of 2-Year Colleges in Recent Statewide 

Studies of Higher Education," Farts I and II, Higher Education , 
October 1957, pp. 23-2?; November 1957, pp. 46-50. 

12. , (editor), Coordinating 2-Year Colleges in State Educational 

Systems . (Report of a Conference, '.Washington, D.C., May 16-17, 
19570 (Washington: U.S. Office of Education, 1957.) 
(Mimeographed.) 65 pages. 



68 



SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY (Continued) 



IT. Medsker, Leland L., The Junior College; Progress and ^rospect . 

(Hew York: McC-raW Hill Look Company, Inc., i960.) 367 pages. 

14. Morrison, D. &., and iiartorana, S. V., Criteria for Es tablishnent of 

2-Year Colleges . (Washington: Government Pri ting Office, i960.) 
101 pages. 

15. Price, Hugh G., California Public Junior Colleges . (Bulletin of the 

Calif omia State Department of Education, February 195$.) 
103 pages. 

16. Russell, John Dale, Higher Education in Michigan . (Pinal P.enort of 

the Survey of Higher Education in Michigan, 1958«) 1^5 pages. 

17. Thornton, James W. , Jr., The Community Junior College . (Hew York: 

John Wiley and Sons, Inc., i960.) 300 pages. 



PROGRESS REPORT RS-42 SEPTEMBER, 1962 



DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



R. L. LOVVORN DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH 



// 






If 












■